MoparFins

Techical Discussions => Tech- - ELECTRICAL => Topic started by: Rob Molloy on July 14, 2011, 09:47:36 AM

Title: Dumb question
Post by: Rob Molloy on July 14, 2011, 09:47:36 AM
So generator went out on the Toga, wanting to switch to an alternator. None of the auto parts stores around here are helpful at all on this situation. Where should I look for an alternator to go on the car, and what would I need to do, if anything, to any of the wiring? Thanks!!
Title: Dumb question
Post by: Steve on July 14, 2011, 11:25:50 AM


I have a wiring diagram somewhere for the electronic regulator
Title: Dumb question
Post by: Jason Goldsack on July 15, 2011, 04:48:15 PM
I think I have a article on the swap from an old Mopar mag.. I'll look  they swapped to a newer system on a 1960 Windsor I think


Title: Dumb question
Post by: Rob Molloy on July 19, 2011, 08:18:37 AM
Steve, I know that the head doesn't have any holes for mounting.
 
The current generator bolts to the manifold. That would be awesome if you were able to find that article Jason. Thanks guys! 
Title: Dumb question
Post by: Guests on July 19, 2011, 08:34:02 AM
I don't know the cost or anything like that, but there are hotrod places out there that can build an alternator inside a generator housing, something the hotrodders like to do/have to keep their rods look original with modern convenience.  If this isn't an option, attach a picture where the alternator is and I can help draw up the necessary brackets needed to attach it strong enough.
Title: Dumb question
Post by: Steve on July 19, 2011, 12:41:10 PM



You need old PPPPFFFFTTTTT's like me around here sometimes.  LOL  Ed's just a pup  (http://www.moparfins.com/forum/smileys/smiley2.gif)
POLARACO2011-07-19 17:45:07
Title: Dumb question
Post by: Guests on July 19, 2011, 01:11:25 PM
Polarizing requires starting the car, then grounding one of the two or three wires that attach to the outside, and although it has been years since doing it, I am thinking it is the + or P (for positive) to the F (for field). How's that Steve? I bet I could find a book that talks about the actual procedure, but I don't think there is any damage that can be done if the wrong one gets touched, is is just a quick short.
 
To add to Steve's stuff, if the bushings (yeah, less than $6), are very tiny or gone and you replace them, the way they are closed up and all, it may be a good idea to take her apart to clean out the copper powder (good way to make them ground out but not normally burn anything up).  The copper armature where the brushes go has grooves in them that can be filled with gunk, a scribe or a tiny screwdriver can be used to run down these grooves to clean them, they are straight front to back, not around and around, so pretty easy to clean.  A dab of grease in the bushing ends and usually good to go.
 
One last voltage regulator check you can do is remove the cover, start the car, and remove one of the battery cables, see if things move when you attach and disconnect. If she dies, generator problem to begin with, but you should get the relays to move some either way. Burned smell is common, but black and burn look is not. A new regulator should, should, should, have the proper polarization procedures with it.
Title: Dumb question
Post by: Steve on July 19, 2011, 01:31:17 PM

Quote from: dana44
Polarizing requires starting the car, then grounding one of the two or three wires that attach to the outside, and although it has been years since doing it, I am thinking it is the + or P (for positive) to the F (for field). How's that Steve? I bet I could find a book that talks about the actual procedure, but I don't think there is any damage that can be done if the wrong one gets touched, is is just a quick short.
 
To add to Steve's stuff, if the bushings (yeah, less than $6), are very tiny or gone and you replace them, the way they are closed up and all, it may be a good idea to take her apart to clean out the copper powder (good way to make them ground out but not normally burn anything up).  The copper armature where the brushes go has grooves in them that can be filled with gunk, a scribe or a tiny screwdriver can be used to run down these grooves to clean them, they are straight front to back, not around and around, so pretty easy to clean.  A dab of grease in the bushing ends and usually good to go.
 
Yeah That's it!  Field to positive.  I remembered that while  I was writing, but have already bit off the end of my foot this week
Title: Dumb question
Post by: Guests on July 19, 2011, 03:28:31 PM
Hey, we are all here to help gather little pieces of information to make a full picture. I don't know or remember everything, but I can usually get headed in the right direction. Now, a second opinion of this would have to be deleted because it would be political(http://www.moparfins.com/forum/smileys/smiley2.gif).
Title: Dumb question
Post by: Rob Molloy on July 21, 2011, 06:15:22 AM
Hmmm....I'm starting to think it may just be easier in the long run to rebuild the generator. Thanks for the help! I will still post pictures of the mounting for the generator to get tips, because I will eventually want to change out for an alternator.