MoparFins

Techical Discussions => Tech- - FUEL => Topic started by: Robert Rottman on April 28, 2009, 05:28:56 AM

Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Robert Rottman on April 28, 2009, 05:28:56 AM
As some of you know...I have a 69 Fury and a 70 Fury too...both with 318's...My 70 Fury does something very different from my 69...When warmed up and then shut off for more than 5 minutes...I starts hard...almost like it has flooded while sitting there...This lasts for hours afterwards...Less than 5 minutes of rest...she starts right up fine...I thought it was the carburator float level...so I checked the float level and it was set too high...but after readjusting it to spec...problem still exists...Anybody have any thoughts on this?...any first hand experience? Thanks, Bob
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Per Therkildsen on April 28, 2009, 06:05:35 AM
Mine does the same 70'Satellite 318.
 
But i have this thought, that my gas vaporize from the carb. because it smells of gas over the carb. when turned off.
I might not be right, but i will follow this post to see what comes up.
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Steve on April 28, 2009, 07:20:47 AM
I'm thinking peculation.  But 5 Minutes isn't that much
 
Couple of questions.
 
How hot is the engine?
Do they both have the same thermostat in them?
When was the engine/rad flushed last.
What kind of shape is the rad in?
 
I ask because my 71F3 did the same thing.  Then I did the rad and flushed the engine.
Problem almost all gone
 
Perculation is a very common problem on Mopar, especially the big blocks.  If you have them well cooled, they'll be fine.
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Robert Rottman on April 28, 2009, 09:16:25 AM
Steve, Temp gauge looks very normal....(below center). I do have a small issue with the radiatior...I have a small leak at the top header which drips a little when I top it off and then it stops dripping after the level drops a little...but the gauge never goes above 1/2 way even during the summer months. I went through the cooling system last summer when I cleaned out the intake. New thermostat...(185 or 195 deg. - don't remember which one I got now) new hoses and new coolant. I had the small leak at the top of the header soldered at that time, but it did not fix the leak....The guy said I'd need a re-core if that did not fix it...just haven't gotten around to getting the re-core yet...Anyway...I had the problem before all these new parts and after them too...but the radiator is the one common item here...leaked before and leaks after too...Could a small laeak at the top be the culprit here? THe temp gauge doesn't show anything abnormal...Thanks...You say perculating huh?..never heard of that in a car before...don't know what that means...I know when I'm perculating...that's not good news for anyone around me(http://www.moparfins.com/forum/smileys/smiley2.gif)
 
furyfever2009-04-28 14:21:40
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Per Therkildsen on April 28, 2009, 10:01:48 AM
Quote from: furyfever
You say perculating huh?..never heard of that in a car before...don't know what that means...I know when I'm perculating...that's not good news for anyone around me(http://www.moparfins.com/forum/smileys/smiley2.gif)
 
 
Well i dont even know when im doing it (http://www.moparfins.com/forum/smileys/smiley11.gif) because i dont know what it means.
And that Rad thing you talk about means ??
 
Furyfever i hope it ok that i join you here, same problem.
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Robert Rottman on April 28, 2009, 10:24:02 AM
Quote from: 70Satellite
 
 
Well i dont even know when im doing it (http://www.moparfins.com/forum/smileys/smiley11.gif) because i dont know what it means.
And that Rad thing you talk about means ??
 
 
Per, I don't mind at all that you're joining in here on this same problem. I hope we can get them both figured out...Steve mentioned perculation. That's what a coffee pot does...I think...I added a little joke...when I'm perculating, I have gas....so everyone around just might have a problem too...You know what I mean? (http://www.moparfins.com/forum/smileys/smiley2.gif) We all are made basically the same so anyone could say this too...Hopefully Steve will let us know what perculation in car actually means. 
 
About the Rad...(radiator)...I have a small leak in my radiator at the top header...that's the junction at the top tank and core (cooling fins). It's not a real bad thing in my opinion because it still holds almost all of it's coolant.
 
Now I'm thinking though....Why don't I have serious leakage here...when pressure builds up it should shoot out of that little hole...even though it's at the top...Maybe I'm not building up pressure? Bad radiator cap too? What do you think Steve?
 
Bob
 
furyfever2009-04-28 15:39:12
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Per Therkildsen on April 29, 2009, 05:17:08 AM
Well my engine does not get too hot, but i dont know how hot, but i would say normal temp. it doesnt boil under long slow cruising.
And i have no leaks on the water side, but my carb needs new gaskets i think, i just have to find them.
 
Actually i was wondering as you said you had a leak in the radiator, you should loose water when on temp.
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Robert Rottman on April 29, 2009, 05:58:02 AM
Quote from: 70Satellite
And i have no leaks on the water side, but my carb needs new gaskets i think, i just have to find them.
 
Buy a carb rebuild kit at your local parts store...You'll need carb #...on a little tag hanging off one of the top screws. Hopefully its still there after all these years.
 
Actually i was wondering as you said you had a leak in the radiator, you should loose water when on temp.
 
 
You know when I shut this 318 down...there's a lot of ticking and clicking going on...like things are cooling down....sounds like expansion & contraction of metals etc....My 69 does not do that...I wonder if this is the perculation that Steve is talking about. I wish others would chime in here...Where are you all???
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Robert Rottman on April 30, 2009, 03:38:34 AM
Per, I don't know what's going on here...These guys are usually right on here to help/ give advice...but so far it's just you and me and one reply from Steve. They must all be on vacation or something....
 
WHERE ARE ALL YOU GUYS? WE COULD USE SOME ADVICE HERE! (http://www.moparfins.com/forum/smileys/smiley7.gif)
 
Anyways, I was just reading a post just below ours here..."Carb drains"...Read that in the mean time...Do you think that's what we're experiencing with our cars???
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Per Therkildsen on April 30, 2009, 05:10:32 AM
Now i have read it, and that could be what happens, and i saw a post here on a Danish forum and there they also said that they changed the starter for a mini thing.
Not that i can see what it has to do with each other.
 
But i would like to know, so please someone tell me.
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Stan Paralikis on April 30, 2009, 05:13:55 AM


[/QUOTE]

All right.  All right.  It looks like I have to come to the rescue here.  Sheesh!  Youse guys....

1. Upgrade to a hi-torque starter and I'll bet most (if not all) of your starting problem goes away.
2. You're not losing much coolant while the engine is running because the coolant is circulating.  Stop the circulation and it will pee out that hole like a race horse.
 
Commando12009-04-30 10:15:25
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Robert Rottman on April 30, 2009, 06:02:41 AM
OK...everyone but Stan is on vacation....Thanks Stan! (http://www.moparfins.com/forum/smileys/smiley19.gif) Mini Hi torque starter huh? Don't have one on my 69 and it doesn't do this hard start when engine warm thang...Hmmmm.
 
Per...Does your car do exactly what mine does? Read carefully....If I shut the car down after a drive (where the engine comes up to operating temperature) and try to start it right back up...It catches (starts-fires-runs) immediately like it should...If I wait a minute or two, same thing...it fires right up...The hard start only happens after about 5 minutes....maybe a bit more...haven't actually timed it (that's an estimate)....and it lasts for hours....I can come out after a full day of work and it will start hard (if it's warm or hot outside)...After a full night of rest, the car will be totally cold and start normally again...This problem only happens when I'm running around making stops and the car stays hot...but again, initially (first time) it doesn't happen immediately...takes 5-6-7 minutes to rear its ugly head. Yes, It's embarrassing at shows/cruise nights etc...Oh...when it starts hard, I have learned to not touch the gas pedal...if I do, it's much worse...acts like it's flooded...The only way to start at that point is to put the pedal to the floor. That's why I thought it was a fuel issue which is why I put it in this Tech-Fuel area of the forum...Thanks, Bob 
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: firedome on April 30, 2009, 06:23:37 AM
Percolation is when engine heat soak can cause the fuel lines/carb to
get hot enough that fuel can begin to vaporize, leading to hot starting
problems... I wouldn't think 5 minutes of  running would do that
though, and it usually wouldn't take hours to go away. I'd suspect some
kind of carb problem would be a possibility, it wouldn't hurt to do a
rebuild, make sure you don't get an over rich condition that could
cause carb flooding and hard starting... I'd see carb heat soak
sometimes in boat engines I worked on in their enclosed boxes in the
transom if blowers weren't turned on and/or a fresh air bilge vent hose
became detached.



Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Steve on April 30, 2009, 07:17:12 AM
Sorry Bob  I''ve been distracted with my own stuff and skimming the forum.
 
Let me read back and give you my "exspurt" opinion
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Per Therkildsen on April 30, 2009, 07:35:18 AM
Now i have read it carefully(very s l o w) so i think i understood it.
And i think my problem is the perco-rize thingy, and i need to find a rebuild set for my Carter.
 
 
Still i cant see what the starter has to do with it, come experts explain please.
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Steve on April 30, 2009, 07:57:26 AM
OK  I have it now. . .
 
Your rad guy probably suggested a new rad core for other reasons too.  They get "solder Bloom" in them which clogs the tubes.  If you look at the tops of the tubes and see a bunch of gunk around all the tubes, it's time.  This restricts cooling too.  Even though the engine is running normal by the gauge, they aren't that accurate.
 
As well as Stans suggestions, I suggets you confirm you have a 180 Stat in there.  I'm pretty sure the 180 was the correct size for back then.
 
I suggest you get the rad recored also.  That leak isn't much, but I bet the tubes are clogged.  Getting the actual temps down matter while running and afterwards.  A good rad will bring down the shut down temps which is where the problem lies in this case.  Even though your engine is off, you still have static flow.
 
Rambling. . .It's not as simple as some people think
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Steve on April 30, 2009, 07:59:37 AM
[/QUOTE]
 
Sorry. . I was out building a diet pepsi can skulpter.  That's Important. . . . isn't it?
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Robert Rottman on April 30, 2009, 09:19:12 AM
Thank you Stan...Thank you Steve...Thank you Roger...Sounds like it's either cooling and/or carburation then. I could swap the radiator and carburator one by one out of the 69 and into the 70 to pinpoint the problem...It sure would have been much more convenient though when I had the 69 all apart! (http://www.moparfins.com/forum/smileys/smiley7.gif) DOH!!(http://www.moparfins.com/forum/smileys/smiley7.gif) Why do I always think of these things afterwards?(http://www.moparfins.com/forum/smileys/smiley36.gif) It sure would be nice to get rid of this problem...like I said...it's mucho embarrassing at cruise nights/shows etc.
 
Bob
 
furyfever2009-04-30 14:21:37
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Steve on April 30, 2009, 10:23:15 AM
I'm leaning towards the rad.  A real good block flush helps too.
 
Old mechanics trick
 
Put some Dawn dish detergent in the rad and run the car for a while.  Be generous.  It loosens the crap in the block and suspends it.  Reflush the system afetr some driveing time and refill.
 
The only other way is to knock out the freeze plugs and flush it out that way.  But it's best to pull the engine for that so you can get them all.  That will help get water completely around the cylinders. and take the heat off.  Besides.  If those are the original plugs, it's time
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Ken on April 30, 2009, 04:30:31 PM
Another thing that could be happening along with the heat-soak situation is the diaphragm in the fuel pump could be weak, not moving the fuel and allowing it to be "boiled" when the engine is hot.

Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Steve on April 30, 2009, 04:57:41 PM
True, but the needle should handle that
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Dan Cluley on April 30, 2009, 05:34:00 PM
I don't have a mini-starter, but this is my understanding of the advantage:
 
They are either geared differently, or draw less current than the old style.  Therefore they crank your engine over faster, so it has a better chance of starting.
 
 Sort of like the difference between how it starts in the summer and how it starts in the winter when it's 10 below and the battery is half dead.   ;)
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Arlen Vander Hoff on May 02, 2009, 05:33:55 PM
Ok heres the deal its an old Mopar not a Ferrari, mine does it too a lot of 'em do that its the nature of the beast.  Even after it sits at work all day "on a warm day" it still cools off to the ambient temp outside ( say its 75 degrees outside the block cools down to 75 or cooler under the hood in the shade) So its gonna start up like its cold because it IS COLD for an engine 75 is cold for something that normal operating temp is 180-195 degrees.
As long as it does start thats the main thing.
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Robert Rottman on May 03, 2009, 05:22:40 PM
Ok...I've always suspected that this is a carburator problem...that's why I put it under tech-fuel...so to finally put this suspicion to rest I swapped carbs tonight...69 to 70...and 70 to 69...Now I'll see if the problem moves from car to car....if not, I'll be doing everything to cool my 70 down like Steve says...(even though the temp. gauge says she's fine)....If that's the case, I better figure out what's going on with the sender/gauge too...
 
furyfever2009-05-03 22:38:26
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Robert Rottman on May 04, 2009, 08:18:36 AM
Alright....now I need  the advice from you carburator specialists. Please read my post from last night...after doing the carburator swap...the 70 runs/starts just like my 69 did now. I went out at lunch...it fired right up...drove it for a few miles...shut it down for about 20-25 minutes...it fired right up...none of that cranking cranking cranking stuff....It's the carburator! I knew it acted like it was flooded...Why does a carburator dump fuel after it's turned off.? Like I said before, I checked the float level on the 70's carb...It's set to spec...I don't want to rebuild it if I don't have to...would just like to fix this fuel dumping problem. furyfever2009-05-04 13:20:22
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Steve on May 04, 2009, 08:54:04 AM
Worn metering rods, or mismatched jets to the rods.  Bad needle and seat, fuel pressure too high from the pump. . .
 
Perculation will cause the carb to dump, which is what we have been discussing.
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Snotty on May 04, 2009, 08:54:27 AM
Do you "gun" your motor right before you turn it off?  (An old practice that I still see people doing today.)  If you do, your motor will turn several more revolutions before it stops.  Each revolution will create vacuum that will draw fuel into your intake and then to your cylinders.  It's not a good practice but would answer the question of fuel in the intake....
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Robert Rottman on May 04, 2009, 09:58:06 AM
Snotty...I don't even "gun" my car when I'm going down the open highway. I never open it up which some people especially my brother...says you have to once in a while "to clean it out"! So the answer is no, I never gun it before I shut it off...I'm an ultra conservative driver...(a characteristic of maturity I guess(http://www.moparfins.com/forum/smileys/smiley2.gif)). I'm convinced it's a carb issue...percolation would be a cooling the block issue correct Steve?... If it was that wouldn't it still be starting hard with this carb too?? I guess I should rebuild it then...
 
Bob
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Steve on May 04, 2009, 10:38:07 AM
Perculation is a heat issue, yes.
 
A while back you asked about a fat gasket.  Does the 70 have that and the 69 does not?  (Maybe I ghave that mixed up.)
 
They put that gasket in there to reduce the perculation.  I am trying to rule out what you have going on.
 
Take the needle and seat out and see if there is a deep groove worn into the needle.  The rubber ones usually seal better.  You'll need to look at it real close with a magnifying glass.  Look for even contact on the rubber or brass.  If it's rubber, look for cracks.
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Robert Rottman on May 04, 2009, 10:56:07 AM
Quote from: POLARACO
Perculation is a heat issue, yes.
 
A while back you asked about a fat gasket.  Does the 70 have that and the 69 does not?  (Maybe I ghave that mixed up.)
 
They put that gasket in there to reduce the perculation.  I am trying to rule out what you have going on.
 
 
At the time Steve...The 70 had one and the 69 did not have one of those thick gaskets...They both have them now....Yes...I thought about taking a close look at the needle and seat...only because I knew what those are(http://www.moparfins.com/forum/smileys/smiley2.gif)...The other things you mentioned earlier...What were they now jets..metering rods...don't know what those are...so they can't be my problem right? Thanks Steve...Not sure if I can do it tonight..but I'll get to it soon....Anyways the 70 is running beautiful now...at the expense of the 69(http://www.moparfins.com/forum/smileys/smiley7.gif) Big Red is still waiting for me to finish fixing the hood molding anyways...(She can't come out till she's purrrfect...) I bent it when I removed the hood(http://www.moparfins.com/forum/smileys/smiley36.gif) That was a real bozo move...Thanks for looking after me Steve...I appreciate it!
furyfever2009-05-04 15:59:49
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Steve on May 04, 2009, 11:02:49 AM
The metering rods are inside the carb.  You have to take the top off to see them.  On the Carter, they are in the back of the bowl.  2 skinny little rods which go to 2 jets in the bottom of the carb.
 
If someone would return my parts, I could take a pic of it
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Snotty on May 05, 2009, 11:16:40 AM
Quote from: furyfever
Snotty...I don't even "gun" my car when I'm going down the open highway. I never open it up which some people especially my brother...says you have to once in a while "to clean it out"! So the answer is no, I never gun it before I shut it off
 
Good, Bob, glad to hear it.  (That practice used to really tick my Dad off!!  Which is probably why I dislike burn-outs to this day, except at a drag strip.)
 
However, don't ever let me drive your car or your brother will get his wish!!  (http://www.moparfins.com/forum/smileys/smiley4.gif)
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Steve on May 05, 2009, 12:31:25 PM
I can Imagine. . .
 
It's all the snacks he stores in his right foot
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Snotty on May 05, 2009, 03:12:22 PM
Vroom, VROOM!!
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Arlen Vander Hoff on May 09, 2009, 05:23:14 PM
I was told or read somewhere if you "gun" the engine before you shut it off it fills the float bowl with gas and the car will start better next time. I take it you guys don't buy this? Sooooooo its not a good idea?
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Snotty on May 11, 2009, 09:38:19 AM
Ar, if your fuel pump is properly workling your bowls should be full anyway.  If you are just idling before shut off, all should be full. 
 
Here's the thinking for being aganst such a parctice:
 
When you shut off your motor at idle, it is turning somewhere between 600-850 RPM.  When the key is turned off the motor will spin several more revolutions before stopping.  Each revolution produces vacuum; that vacuum will continue to draw fuel into your cylinders.  No big deal.  However, when a motor is "gunned" before shut-off, it is turning between 1,500-2,000 RPM.  At that speed, the number of revoultions before the motor finally stops spinning is greatly increased and draws in much more unburnt fuel.  Unburnt fuel in the cylinders creates a leak-down condition on the piston rings, causing pre-mature wear. 
 
What that theory supposes is that the practice of "gunning" leads to earlier deterioration on a motor, especially in the cylinders, casuing early burning of oil.
 
Whether that's true or not I'm sure will be debated now that I've written it, but that is why I was taught not to gun the motor before shut off.
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Arlen Vander Hoff on May 11, 2009, 03:58:45 PM
Yikes!!! OK no more "gunning" for me!!!! I don't need any help tearing stuff up!!!
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Snotty on May 12, 2009, 09:11:15 AM
OK, now, on Global Warming....
(http://www.moparfins.com/forum/smileys/smiley19.gif)
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Robert Rottman on May 18, 2009, 06:53:50 AM
Well...after the carburator swaps and a reasonable amount of driving time on both cars...the problem seems to have dissapeared and it didn't move to the 69 Fury...Its gone!!...Is it possible the fuel pressue is greater on the 70?? and the 69's carb has a better needle/seat that can hold the fuel out better? The reason I theorize this is because I rebulit the 69's carb a few years ago...I have no idea how old the 70's carb rebuild is....It's one of thise things that make you go....."Hhhmmmm"
Bob
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Steve on May 18, 2009, 08:28:18 AM
No  You may have had a oiece of crud in there and you dislodged it when you moved the carbs around
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Snotty on May 18, 2009, 12:11:41 PM
Glad to hear you got it worked out Bob! 
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Robert Rottman on May 18, 2009, 06:25:18 PM
Well... I don't know how I got it worked out Snotty...I'm not sure I buy Steve's theory (piece of crud in there and you dislodged it) because I had that 70 carb apart last summer trying to fix it...I checked the float level and I found it to be too high...Thought for sure after adjusting it to spec. it would have fixed this problem but it didn't....Now that I have it on my 69 it decides to work properly? I didn't plan to leave the carbs swapped...I have not adjusted the chokes yet because I thought it was just going to be a quick test...I guess I'll get in there now (when they're hot) and set up the chokes properly and go with it  this way...at least for the summer. Thanks for the encouragement though brother Snotty.(http://www.moparfins.com/forum/smileys/smiley4.gif) That always goes a long way.
 
furyfever2009-05-22 08:56:44
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Snotty on May 19, 2009, 08:49:23 AM
Anytime my friend!
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Robert Rottman on May 20, 2009, 04:15:58 PM
I guess I jumped to a wrong conclusion. Drove the 70 today...80 degrees here...still has 69 carb on it...It started hard after a 10 mile drive + 20 minute rest...Hhmmmm(http://www.moparfins.com/forum/smileys/smiley17.gif)I guess it isn't a fuel problem after all. Steve...I'm thinking your thoughts now...Percolation. The darn thing runs cooler than my 69 (according to the temp gauge)...Maybe its time to borrow a thermocouple reader from work and take temp. readings on both cars...in the same locations on the motor. What would be the best location to choose? top of water pump?
 
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Stan Paralikis on May 21, 2009, 02:55:37 AM
I'm still sticking by my advise for a new starter....
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Robert Rottman on May 21, 2009, 03:56:15 AM
Quote from: Commando1
I'm still sticking by my advise for a new starter....
I certainly can't rule that out either Stan...Maybe the ol' starter is getting tired...when heat soaked maybe it's not putting out the RPM's as when its cold...Hmmm...My Chevy truck sort of had a problem like that...but worse...when heat soaked it put out ZERO RPM's(http://www.moparfins.com/forum/smileys/smiley36.gif) Thanks Stan
furyfever2009-05-21 09:28:47
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: firedome on May 21, 2009, 04:59:23 AM
I'd lean towards Stan's theory at this point - I see it all the time on old outboards... 

Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Snotty on May 21, 2009, 09:20:56 AM
I had a similar problem and it was the starter.  Not only did it turn slowly, and more-so when hot, it drew so much amperage that it drained the CPU of needed current.  Eventually the CPU burnt out and I was towed home.  Chris "The Doctor" measured the amps my starter was drawing and said, "Buy a new starter."
 
Yesterday it was close to 100* here; I drove my Newport to Visalia - and hour drive.  After stopping my carb did percolate, but it still started every time!  Before, it would crank to a slow stop - drained battery.
 
Get a starter!
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Robert Rottman on May 21, 2009, 09:27:28 AM
Quote from: Snotty
 Yesterday it was close to 100* here; I drove my Newport to Visalia - and hour drive.  After stopping my carb did percolate, but it still started every time!  Before, it would crank to a slow stop - drained battery.
 
 
Snotty...How did you know that: your carb did percolate? Is it something you can hear? smell?
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Snotty on May 21, 2009, 02:02:29 PM
Quote from: furyfever
 
 


It's more of an assumption based on conditions, Bob.  After a "hot run" the car acts like it has no fuel in the carb - like when I stopped on my way home yesterday.  I got back in the car 20 minutes later and it had to turn over a significant number of times before it would fire.  But, that never happens in the winter, no matter how long I drive the car.
 
When Frances got home she knew I had driven the Newport.  When I asked her how, she said she smelled the gas.  That is a summer/hot phenominon.  It has no fuel smell in the winter.
 
When I try to start the car next it will need to turn over for a while.  But when I climbed in yesterday morning it fired instantly.  The previous time I had run it was just out to my street and back - not long enough to get warm, much less hot.  That was last Friday.  The difference has to be heat in the carb.
 
I have an aluminum Eddy intake with no heat pads under it, and have removed the heat-riser from the exhaust manifolds.  On a truly hot day - above 110* - after a long drive it will starve for fuel after starting.  I often "burp" the gas tank after such a drive before starting it again.  I attribuite all of these issues to boiled gas.
 
I could be wrong, but I've learned to accept it.  Putting the new starter on has removed the doubt I had developed that the car would start.  I know it will now; I did not have that confidence before.
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Robert Rottman on May 22, 2009, 04:07:10 AM
Originally posted by Snotty:
After a "hot run" the car acts like it has no fuel in the carb - like when I stopped on my way home yesterday.  I got back in the car 20 minutes later and it had to turn over a significant number of times before it would fire.  But, that never happens in the winter, no matter how long I drive the car.
 
This is exactly what I'm talking about Snotty...You are describing my 1970 Fury III exactly. My 1969 Fury III has never exhibited this "hot start - hard start" phenomenon though. Your Newport is a 1970 as well right? Did Ma Mopar cheapen something up in 1970?...or is it a coincidence?...
furyfever2009-05-22 09:09:23
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Stan Paralikis on May 22, 2009, 04:30:36 AM
(http://www.moparfins.com/forum/smileys/smiley16.gif)



 
 
Replace the starter....(http://www.moparfins.com/forum/smileys/smiley7.gif)
Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: firedome on May 22, 2009, 03:16:27 PM
No they didn't cheapen anything on the drivetrain as far as I know...
trim maybe, they are always trying to cut out nickels and dimes...

Title: Starting a warm 318...
Post by: Snotty on May 23, 2009, 09:10:45 AM
Bob, I had the same hard-start problem in the '62 New Yorker as well.  I think it's a condition of the Big Block Chrysler.  Your's being a 318 must just be a coincidence.  I never had that problem with the 318/360s I have owned.  I pulled trailers in very hot summer conditions with a Fifth Avenue (318), a Cordoba (360), a B250 van (318 Magnum), and a RamCharger (360) and never expierenced the problem.
 
However, the RC was a pain to start and keep running in the snow!  Once it warmed up it was great, but my-oh-my, it chugged for ten minutes when cold!!!