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Author Topic: Difference in Engines  (Read 9793 times)

Mike

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Difference in Engines
« on: September 26, 2007, 08:19:20 AM »

Whats the difference between the Hemi's of the 50's and the Hemi's made in 66-71 or are they essentially the same? 

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Johnny D.

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« Reply #1 on: September 26, 2007, 10:24:51 AM »

you writing a book? 

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Herman

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« Reply #2 on: September 26, 2007, 10:32:52 AM »

The only thing they have in common is the Hemispherical combustionchamber...



James Brown Jr,

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« Reply #3 on: September 26, 2007, 10:45:39 AM »

they are completely different motors( other than the combustion chambers)
i guess alot of people like the old ones better but i believe there is nothing more fun than popping the hood and seeing a black and orange 426
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Steve

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« Reply #4 on: September 26, 2007, 10:59:30 AM »

The older ones had a narrower skirt so they had shorter strokes.  In some cases it's a fit problem that old Hemi solves
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Herman

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Difference in Engines
« Reply #5 on: September 26, 2007, 11:08:40 AM »

I'm currently building a 392 Hemi to be placed in my '62 Chrysler-wagon.
That same wagon also hauled it home from across the country (= here 200 miles)







Mike

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« Reply #6 on: September 26, 2007, 11:26:01 AM »

Thank you Fellas, and thank you BigBlock for the Helpfull pictures.
Foamy i can agree with you popping the hood and seeing a black and
orange 426 is pretty damn awsome. 

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Marc

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« Reply #7 on: September 26, 2007, 11:30:00 AM »

For more information i recomend Tex Smiths The Complete Chrysler Hemi Engine Manual.
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Johnny D.

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« Reply #8 on: September 26, 2007, 11:41:27 AM »


"Chrysler produced their first engines with hemispherically-shaped combustion chambers in the 1951, but these early motors (301, 331, 354, and 392 cu. in.) share nothing in common with the 426
except for spark plug location and basic valve train arrangement. These
"old style" hemis were primarily passenger-car motors, although later versions did power
the legendary Crysler 300 "letter cars" until 1958. Chrysler referred
to these engines as the "Red Ram", "Firedome" and "Firepower" motors
throughout their production. Horsepower peaked in 1958 with a 2-4bbl
version of the 392 rated at 390 hp. Today, these motors are difficult
to find, and those which aren't in restored vehicles are most often
found in fuel dragsters and funny cars, running on alcohol...."

thats from Allpar.com

i also highly reccomend this one quit interesting  http://www.allpar.com/mopar/hemi/chrysler-hemi.html where you can see a V16 Hemi for the XP-47 Thunderbolt...

"The inverted V-16 was conservatively rated at 2,500 horsepower, and
Chrysler has always been known for under rating their engines.
For testing, a P-47 Thunderbolt was selected. Introduced in 1943,
the P-47 was the largest and heaviest single seater in the Air Force
inventory at the time. It was powered by a huge 2,800 cubic inch radial
engine that developed 2,300 horsepower. It gave the 40 foot wing span
If you read further it says estimates put the engine at 3,500 hp!
MobStaffCar722007-09-26 16:47:06
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Mike

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« Reply #9 on: September 26, 2007, 11:47:24 AM »

Alright Yooooo-Beeeeee!, all this knowledge is great. 

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Johnny D.

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« Reply #10 on: September 26, 2007, 11:53:39 AM »

I do what I can with what I got! everyone else here has skill... I just fake it!

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Steve

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« Reply #11 on: September 26, 2007, 04:07:13 PM »

You can run. . .But you can't hide. <Aint no Mountain high enough, Aint no valley low enough>
 
Rear engined Hemi 62 Chrysler Wagon.  MMMMMM    That's better than a Diesel 72 Polara
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Mike

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« Reply #12 on: September 26, 2007, 04:32:02 PM »

I like the sound of a rear engine 62 Chrysler Wagon, but a Diesel 72
Polara would be awsome, in fact make it a turbo Diesel. B your right
everyone is very helpful and knowledgable.

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Steve

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« Reply #13 on: September 26, 2007, 04:33:43 PM »

My fault. . .we're straying off topic in the Tech section.
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Mike

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« Reply #14 on: September 26, 2007, 04:48:12 PM »

Quote from: POLARACO
The older ones had a narrower skirt so they had shorter
strokes.  In some cases it's a fit problem that old Hemi
solves

Did that mean that the block was smaller, or shortened in anyway, and
excuse me if this is a dumb question , what is a skirt in relation to
the older Hemi's or a engine in general.


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