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Author Topic: Difference in Engines  (Read 10540 times)

James Brown Jr,

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Difference in Engines
« Reply #60 on: October 23, 2007, 10:35:41 AM »

well YES for the most part, but the caddy motor was really 500 CI but is commonly confused.
 
from the 50's all the way to the late 80's Buick, Olds, Pontiac, Chevy, and Caddy used differant motors. sure some models here and there used Engines from other car company's(IE. Olds and Caddy) but most of them were diff.ok this is some info i got from www.Wikipedia.org concerning GM v8's
sorry it's a little long but has LOTS of info.
 

From the 1950s through the 1970s, each GM division had its own V8 engine family. Many were shared among other divisions, but each design is most-closely associated with its own division. Chevrolet had two different V8s, the big-block and small-block. Today, there are only three V8 engines produced by GM: the Generation IV small-block and big-block, and Cadillac's advanced DOHC V8, the Northstar.
    1914-1992
Cadillac V8
    1914
Type 51 314 in³ (5.1 L)
1928 341/346/322 341 in³ (5.6 L), 346 in³ (5.7 L), 322 in³ (5.3 L)
1949 331 331 in³ (5.4 L), 365 in³ (6.0 L), 390 in³ (6.4 L)
1963 429 429 in³ (7.0 L), 472 in³ (7.7 L), 500 in³ (8.2 L)
1977 L33/L35/L61/L62 425 in³ (7.0 L), 368 in³ (6.0 L) V8-6-4
1949-1990 Oldsmobile Rocket V8
    1949-1964
Generation 1 (303/324/371/394/215)
1953-1980 Buick V8
    1953-1959
Buick (264/322)
1957-1966 Nailhead (364/400/401/425)
1961-1980 Buick "Small-Block" (215/300/340/350)
1954-1980 Pontiac V8
    1955-1958
Pontiac/GMC V8 (287/288/316/336/347/370)
1959-1980 Pontiac V8 (326/350/389/400/421/428/455)
1958-1983 GMC
    1958-1959
GMC 336 336 in³ (5.5 L) 90°
1960s GMC 637 637 in³ (10.4 L) 60°
  • 1969-1983 GMC 366 366 in³ (6.0 L) 90°
1961-1964 Buick/Oldsmobile/Pontiac 215 aluminum V8 (now Rover V8 engine)
1954-1968 Chevrolet small-block V8
    1954-1956
265 in³ Corvette V8
1957-1962 283 in³ Corvette V8
1967-1969 302 in³ Camaro Z28
1963-1968 327 in³ Corvette V8
1975-1976 4.3 L Monza V8
1969-2005 Chevrolet Small-Block 350
    1969-1975
ZQ3
1969-1972 L46 - High-compression
1970-1972 LT-1 - High-performance
1971-1979 L48
1973-1980 L82 - Modified 350
1974-1981 LM1 - 350
1980-1987 LG4 - California L48
1981 L81
1982-1984 L83
1985-1996 L05
1985-1991 L98
1958-present Chevrolet Big-Block engine
    1958-1965
Generation 1 (348/409)
1965-1996 Generation 2 (396/402/427/454)
1996-2001 L19 Vortec 7400 - 7.4 L V8
[/list]
GM later standardized on the later generations of the Chevrolet design:
    1990-1994
LT5 - Corvette ZR-1 V8
1993-1997 Generation 2 small-block pushrod V8 family:
    1993-1997
LT1 - 5.7 L V8
  • 1996-1997 LT4 - High-output LT1
1998-present Generation 3 small-block pushrod V8 family:
    1997-2004
LS1 - 5.7 L V8
1999-2004 LS1 C4B - 5.7 L V8 - Callaway modified LS1 producing 300 kW (400 hp) used in HSV sedans and coupes
2001-2004 LS6 - High-output LS1
LR4 Vortec 4800 - 4.8 L
L33/LM4/LM7/L59 Vortec 5300 - 5.3 L
LQ4 Vortec 6000 - 6.0 L
2005-present Generation 4 small-block pushrod V8 family:
    2005-present
L76 - 6.0 L
2005-present L98 - 6.0 L
2005-present LS2 - 6.0 L
2006-present LS4 - 5.3 L transverse V8
2005-present LS7 - 7.0 L High-performance Gen IV engine
2008-present LS3 - 6.2 L
LH6/LY5/LC9 Vortec 5300 - 5.3 L Vortec
LY6/L76 Vortec 6000 - 6.0 L Vortec
[/list]
Other GM V8 engines include the following:
    1982-2000
Detroit Diesel V8 - 6.2/6.5 L Diesel
Duramax Diesel V8 family:
    LG5 - 7.8 L Diesel
    1992-present Premium V DOHC
      LD8/L37/LH2 Northstar - 4.6 L V8
      Foamy_3022007-10-23 15:39:49
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      Mike

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      « Reply #61 on: October 23, 2007, 01:14:44 PM »

      I stand by my remark is saying that the blocks were the same but they
      were engineered differently, amd for the all the cookies Scott the only
      GM car that got the 500 was the Eldorado with the exception in 75 when
      all Cadillac models got the 500 and then it went back to the Eldorado
      only in 76 and 77 was a downsize year where the 425 came in and I
      believe the 500 was an order option of you wanted it.

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      Steve

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      « Reply #62 on: October 23, 2007, 01:35:48 PM »

      This is a Mopar Site POLARACO2007-10-23 18:36:16
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      Steve

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      « Reply #63 on: October 23, 2007, 01:46:31 PM »

      Quote from: Snotty
      Absolutely right, Moe.  But another fact - it was available in Plymouth only!
       
      Chrysler's 350 is a trivia question I like to toss out at people.  (Did they make one?)  I do the same with these questions:  [color=#00ff00 size=3]YES  Forgot the year  late 50's[/color]
      Did Chevy ever build a 302?  [color=#00ff00 size=3]Yes  Camaro[/color]
      What's the difference between a Chevy 400 and a Chevy 400?  [color=#00ff00 size=3]2 bolt or 4 bolt?  Big or small block?  Need to specify that. . all of the above[/color]
      If Chrysler's 350 and Chevy's 348 are both big blocks, how come a Pontiac 455 and an AMC 401 are not?  [color=#00ff33 size=3]Not sure, But I would think space problems in AMC Bodies[/color]
      Which Chrysler motor had the largest pistons?  [color=#00ff00 size=3]MMMMM It's not a 440 or 426[/color]
      WHy does a Ford 427 have more horsepower than a Ford 428? 
      WHy won't headers for a Chevy 350 fit on a Pontiac 350?  [color=#00ff00 size=3]Two completely different engines[/color]
      Why is a Chrysler 318 physically larger than a Chevy 350?  318 Has deeper skirts to support the main caps Same question for a Chrysler 350 and an AMC 401?
       
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      James Brown Jr,

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      « Reply #64 on: October 23, 2007, 01:55:12 PM »

      Quote from: POLARACO
      This is a Mopar Site
       
      here ya go Steve.
      hay guys this is an Exerpt(spelling??) from Wikipedia's list of Chrysler Engines. lets see if we can make a few corrections. other than the mistakes it's still good info.
       

      Inline 8
      Inline 8 cylinder - Chrysler's early flathead inline 8-cylinder 5.3L engine used on cars such as Airflows, DeSotos and Imperials. With side valves and aluminum pistons, this was a low-rpm engine that produced about 120hp.

      Small block V8
      Chrysler's small-block V8 engines all derive from the classic A engine:
        A small-block - Chrysler's first small-block V8.
        1964-present LA small-block - An evolution of the A engine, and extremely successful. The original LA design was in use until recently, as were V6 and V10 engines based on this design. Today, the only LA-derived engine design currently in use is the Viper V10. (273/318/340/360)
        5.9 (360) - Used in the Coronet, Charger and Belvedere
        PowerTech - Chrysler's new 4.7 L V8 for Jeep
        5.7 L Hemi - The modern Hemi, introduced in 2002.
        • 6.1 L Hemi - A larger modern Hemi, introduced in 2004.
        • Eagle — Future replacement for the 5.7L Hemi
        Chrysler also inherited an engine from American Motors (AMC):
        • 1970-1991 AMC 360 - American Motors' "GEN-2" V8s were first introduced mid-1966 in a Rambler American Rogue hardtop. The 360 version of this engine family continued to be produced after the 1987 buyout by Chrysler Corporation. This 360 in³ (5.9 L) V8 powered the Jeep Grand Wagoneer, which was produced until 1991.
        Big block V8
        Chrysler's big-block V8s fall into the following families:
          1958-1978
        Chrysler B engine (350/361/383/400)
        1959-1978 Chrysler RB engine (383/413/426W/440)
        The 383 cubic inch RB Block was only available in 1959-1960 on the US built Chrysler Windsor and Saratoga.


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        Snotty

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        « Reply #65 on: October 23, 2007, 02:34:22 PM »

        OK, let me see how you did:
         
        Chrysler's 350 is a trivia question I like to toss out at people.  (Did they make one?)  I do the same with these questions:  [color=#00ff00 size=3]YES  Forgot the year  late 50's[/color]
        [color=#ff0000 size=3]This was mentioned earlier - 1958, Plymouth only.[/color]
        [color=#ff0000 size=3][/color] 
        Did Chevy ever build a 302?  [color=#00ff00 size=3]Yes  Camaro[/color]
        [color=#ff0000 size=3]Bingo!  Which year(s)?[/color]
        [color=#ff0000 size=3][/color] 
        What's the difference between a Chevy 400 and a Chevy 400?  [color=#00ff00 size=3]2 bolt or 4 bolt?  Big or small block?  Need to specify that. . all of the above[/color]
        [color=#ff0000 size=3]I was thinking small vs. big block, but the last comment is also correct![/color]
        [color=#00ff00 size=3][/color] 
        If Chrysler's 350 and Chevy's 348 are both big blocks, how come a Pontiac 455 and an AMC 401 are not?  [color=#00ff33 size=3]Not sure, But I would think space problems in AMC Bodies[/color]
        [color=#ff0000 size=3]No!  Here's a common misunderstanding.  Unlike Mopar, Chevy, or Ford, Pontiac (and others) and AMC only had one block that was bored and stroked to different sizes.  Since Mopar had the LA and B/RB motors, and nothing could be interchanged between the two, one was considered "big" and the other "small."  It had/has nothing to do with cubes.  The AMC 390 and 401 blocks had a raised deck that the 290, 304, 343, and 360 blocks did not have, but they were not "bog blocks" as so many people errornously call them.  AMC did have another series of motors that were introduced in '55, the largest of which was a 327, but those motors were discontinued once the new motors were introduced.[/color]
        [color=#ff0000 size=3][/color] 
        Which Chrysler motor had the largest pistons?  [color=#00ff00 size=3]MMMMM It's not a 440 or 426[/color]
        [color=#ff0000 size=3]It's the 400.[/color]
        [color=#ff0000 size=3][/color] 
        WHy does a Ford 427 have more horsepower than a Ford 428? 
        [color=#ff0000 size=3]No guess?[/color]
        [color=#ff0000 size=3][/color] 
        WHy won't headers for a Chevy 350 fit on a Pontiac 350?  [color=#00ff00 size=3]Two completely different engines[/color]
        [color=#ff0000 size=3]Bingo again![/color]
        [color=#ff0000 size=3][/color] 
        Why is a Chrysler 318 physically larger than a Chevy 350?  318 Has deeper skirts to support the main caps Same question for a Chrysler 350 and an AMC 401?
        [color=#ff0000 size=3]Actually, it has everthing to do with math.  Your answer is probably perfectly acceptable, but a cylinder's volume has nothing to do with how physically large a motor is.  [/color]
         
        Ta Daaaa!
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        James Brown Jr,

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        « Reply #66 on: October 23, 2007, 02:46:20 PM »

        Quote from: Snotty
        WHy does a Ford 427 have more horsepower than a Ford 428? 
        [color=#ff0000 size=3]No guess?[/color]
         
        well that ones easy. Ford made the 427SOHC for NASCAR. which the 428 Cobra Jet wasn't quite as "race bred"
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        Steve

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        « Reply #67 on: October 23, 2007, 03:54:42 PM »

        Quote from: Snotty
        OK, let me see how you did:
         
        Chrysler's 350 is a trivia question I like to toss out at people.  (Did they make one?)  I do the same with these questions:  [color=#00ff00 size=3]YES  Forgot the year  late 50's[/color]
        [color=#ff0000 size=3]This was mentioned earlier - 1958, Plymouth only.[/color]
        [color=#ffff00 size=3]I thought I read that, but ignored it[/color]
        [color=#ff0000 size=3][/color] 
        Did Chevy ever build a 302?  [color=#00ff00 size=3]Yes  Camaro[/color]
        [color=#ff0000 size=3]Bingo!  Which year(s)?[/color]
        [color=#ffff00 size=3]I'm not a Chevy Guy.  But it seems to me it was 68 or 69[/color]
        [color=#ff0000 size=3][/color] 
        What's the difference between a Chevy 400 and a Chevy 400?  [color=#00ff00 size=3]2 bolt or 4 bolt?  Big or small block?  Need to specify that. . all of the above[/color]
        [color=#ff0000 size=3]I was thinking small vs. big block, but the last comment is also correct![/color]
        [color=#ffff00 size=4]Gee thanks[/color]
        [color=#00ff00 size=3][/color] 
        If Chrysler's 350 and Chevy's 348 are both big blocks, how come a Pontiac 455 and an AMC 401 are not?  [color=#00ff33 size=3]Not sure, But I would think space problems in AMC Bodies[/color]
        [color=#ff0000 size=3]No!  Here's a common misunderstanding.  Unlike Mopar, Chevy, or Ford, Pontiac (and others) and AMC only had one block that was bored and stroked to different sizes.  Since Mopar had the LA and B/RB motors, and nothing could be interchanged between the two, one was considered "big" and the other "small."  It had/has nothing to do with cubes.  The AMC 390 and 401 blocks had a raised deck that the 290, 304, 343, and 360 blocks did not have, but they were not "bog blocks" as so many people errornously call them.  AMC did have another series of motors that were introduced in '55, the largest of which was a 327, but those motors were discontinued once the new motors were introduced.[/color]
        [color=#ffff00 size=3]I still don't consider AMC as part of Chrysler.  Never paid attention to AMC as a result[/color]
        [color=#ff0000 size=3][/color] 
        Which Chrysler motor had the largest pistons?  [color=#00ff00 size=3]MMMMM It's not a 440 or 426[/color]
        [color=#ff0000 size=3]It's the 400.[/color]
        [color=#ffff00 size=3]Learn something new every day.  I only know how to build them and fix them  To me, as you would say Scott, "WHO CARES!"  Just gimme 8 of 'em and let me get this job done  [/color]
        [color=#ff0000 size=3][/color] 
        WHy does a Ford 427 have more horsepower than a Ford 428? 
        [color=#ff0000 size=3]No guess?[/color]
        [color=#ffff00 size=4]Does Foamy win a cookie?[/color]
        [color=#ff0000 size=3][/color] 
        WHy won't headers for a Chevy 350 fit on a Pontiac 350?  [color=#00ff00 size=3]Two completely different engines[/color]
        [color=#ff0000 size=3]Bingo again![/color]
        [color=#ff0000 size=3][/color] 
        Why is a Chrysler 318 physically larger than a Chevy 350?  318 Has deeper skirts to support the main caps Same question for a Chrysler 350 and an AMC 401?
        [color=#ff0000 size=3]Actually, it has everthing to do with math.  Your answer is probably perfectly acceptable, but a cylinder's volume has nothing to do with how physically large a motor is.[/color]
        [color=#ffff00 size=4]I agree with that and thought about it when replying.  Wasn't sure what you were after.  It's all in what the manufacturer desired in the design, weight needed, a bunch of factors.  They get 572 out of a 360 now. . .[/color]
         
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        James Brown Jr,

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        « Reply #68 on: October 23, 2007, 09:47:32 PM »

        " Drools over 572" ohh i like the sound of that.
        by the way does anyone know the biggest cubic inches you can get from a LA318 block??
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        Mike

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        « Reply #69 on: October 24, 2007, 06:55:32 AM »

        Ok what changes and improvments where made between the 360 and when the 340 came out?

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        James Brown Jr,

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        « Reply #70 on: October 24, 2007, 09:52:05 AM »

        umm. i really don't know that one. didn't it have to do with Emissions??
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        Snotty

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        « Reply #71 on: October 24, 2007, 10:38:28 AM »

        Quote from: Foamy_302
        Quote from: Snotty
        WHy does a Ford 427 have more horsepower than a Ford 428? 
        [color=#ff0000 size=3]No guess?[/color]
         
         
        That's a 2/3rds Bingo!  You forgot the 427 "side oiler" that was in the 427 Cobra and Fairlane GT(A).  But your answer about the 428 is "spot on" as our British friends would say! 
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        James Brown Jr,

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        « Reply #72 on: October 24, 2007, 10:40:21 AM »

        yea but you can't say Cobra 427 or Fairlane GTA without thinking of performance or racing.
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        Snotty

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        « Reply #73 on: October 24, 2007, 10:42:08 AM »

        Quote from: POLARACO
        Did Chevy ever build a 302?  [b
        [color=#00ff00 size=3]Yes  Camaro[/color][/b]
        [color=#ff0000 size=3]Bingo!  Which year(s)?[/color]
        [color=#ffff00 size=3]I'm not a Chevy Guy.  But it seems to me it was 68 or 69[/color]
        [color=#ff0000 size=3][/color] 
        [color=#ffff00 size=4]  They get 572 out of a 360 now. . .[/color]
        [/QUOTE]
         
        The Chevy 302 was available in '67-'69.  I thought it was only '69, but a Chevy guy corrected me recently at a show.
         
        I knew they were getting 440 out of a 360, but I did not know they had gotten as much as 572!  Wow!
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        James Brown Jr,

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        « Reply #74 on: October 24, 2007, 10:43:57 AM »

        hmm a 440CI LA. lol i could even put 440 badges on susan
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