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Author Topic: Chrylser & Fiat  (Read 2277 times)

firedome

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Chrylser & Fiat
« Reply #30 on: October 30, 2013, 05:01:02 PM »

Why do the Brits drink warm beer??  'Cause they have Lucas refrigerators!!  ...LOL

Actually I loved all the TRs, despite all their faults, they were/are a blast to drive. I wish all the US muscle car drivers would drive one to appreciate the difference of it...if they are real drivers that is.  IMO MGBs are even better, not as fast, but you can drive them at 10/10ths, totally balls to the wall, everything just falls in to place to a degree I've never experienced in any other car except a BMW 2002, even in my '69 XKE Jag. And the body structure is much stiffer and rigid due to overkill monococque construction, stiff even by modern day standards, nothing that a TR could ever  be accused of! You can tell MGs were really successful race cars for decades starting in the '30s... but then again I'm also a motorcycle rider of 45 years, so in reality any car suffers in comparison. I'm restoring an Italian Harley/Aermacchi Sprint 350 as the latest cycle project around here.




firedome2013-10-30 21:16:14
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dana44

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Chrylser & Fiat
« Reply #31 on: October 30, 2013, 06:13:54 PM »

I can agree with that. Had a 78 Spitfire I bought for Dad, nice and fun to drive, but yeah, drivelines were always messing up U-joints. Stiffness, no, but I am going to fix that. I put the empty body into the back of the truck by myself, I hauled the frame to the garage on my shoulder like a ladder, the block is a little bit on the awkward side and a bit on the SBC weight of a block, but those darn floating cylinders, not a travelling car by any means. I think the Dakota 2.5 and 5 spd will work just fine with a set of 4.10s in the rear end (stock, good for 400hp), and a little bit of a roll cage to stiffen things up a bit, but hey, 1750lbs, what can one expect?
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68 Charger 440 6pac/02 PT Cruiser/63 TR4 2.5 5spd/39 Nash Business Coupe/95 Dakota Sport 3.9 5spd/81 Z28/ USN Retired

Jacques

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Chrylser & Fiat
« Reply #32 on: October 31, 2013, 12:56:16 AM »

The difference between the brit sportscars, and the US-musclecars is easy to understand when yo look at the roads. US-roads are usually wide and straight, UK-roads twisty and narrow.

Quote from: firedome
Why do the Brits drink warm beer??  'Cause they have Lucas refrigerators!!  ...LOL






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ex-Mopars 1967 Chrysler Newport Custom Coupe, 1973 Imperial LeBaron 2dr hardtop, 1973 Imperial LeBaron 4dr Hardtop, 1971 Plymouth Sport Fury 2 door hardtop

firedome

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Chrylser & Fiat
« Reply #33 on: October 31, 2013, 05:26:39 AM »

I've always thought that US cars were/are best for US roads, superhighways, straight in suburbs, out West really primitive. rugged, and remote in some places, which led to really overbuilt heavy powerful sturdy cars.  and European cars best for Europe's roads, narrow twisty and tight, leading to nimble light and frugal cars. The cars evolved to meet the conditions that they faced. Now everything is merging together, but more like the European mold, which is both good and bad. I miss those overbuilt steel and iron tanks of yore. But not the gas bills.

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dana44

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Chrylser & Fiat
« Reply #34 on: October 31, 2013, 07:03:55 AM »

Yeah, I have to agree. There were too many people trying to make trecks across America in MGs, and they just weren't designed to be driven that way, thus they got a much worse reputation than the American iron. Closest British car capable of doing it the American way was the Jaguar. Built a little sturdier, but still had their issues.
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68 Charger 440 6pac/02 PT Cruiser/63 TR4 2.5 5spd/39 Nash Business Coupe/95 Dakota Sport 3.9 5spd/81 Z28/ USN Retired

Jacques

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Chrylser & Fiat
« Reply #35 on: October 31, 2013, 08:08:27 AM »

Don't forget cars like the Rover 3500 and Triumph 2500, those were fine cars for trans-continental trips, but for that purpose, of course nothing beats an Imperial or C-body. (or maybe a Bentley/Rolls but haven't had the luck to do a long trip in one of those...)

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ex-Mopars 1967 Chrysler Newport Custom Coupe, 1973 Imperial LeBaron 2dr hardtop, 1973 Imperial LeBaron 4dr Hardtop, 1971 Plymouth Sport Fury 2 door hardtop

dana44

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Chrylser & Fiat
« Reply #36 on: October 31, 2013, 09:15:04 AM »

Yes, because the Rover was a workhorse engine, vice a performance engine, not too familiar with the other. Agree with the C bodies. I drove a 1962 Cadillac Hearse several years and it was the best travelling car you can imagine, much like the C bodies.
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68 Charger 440 6pac/02 PT Cruiser/63 TR4 2.5 5spd/39 Nash Business Coupe/95 Dakota Sport 3.9 5spd/81 Z28/ USN Retired

Jacques

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« Reply #37 on: October 31, 2013, 10:55:19 AM »

And in order to make full-circle, in the past, Lancia had a few nice cars, like the Aurelia, sort of gt-car. Later on, Lancia was purchased by Fiat.



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ex-Mopars 1967 Chrysler Newport Custom Coupe, 1973 Imperial LeBaron 2dr hardtop, 1973 Imperial LeBaron 4dr Hardtop, 1971 Plymouth Sport Fury 2 door hardtop

firedome

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« Reply #38 on: November 02, 2013, 07:09:49 AM »

The British car mag "Autocar" once compared a '72 Rolls to a '72 Olds 98... they declared the Olds to be superior in virtually every way related to driving and dynamics, the Rolls in fit & finish and luxury materials.  They concluded that the Olds was an incredible bargain for a full-on luxury car. An Imp would have done at least equally well in comparison imo. To drive across the US anywhere, , I'd take a big American luxury car, circa '65 to '75, over anything else ever made! (as long as I didn't have to pay for the gas!)

The Triumph 2500 was a neat little sports sedan like a BMW 2002 but had the 2.5 inline six of the TR-5  (called 1968 TR-250 in US, we had one, should have kept it rattles and all) and TR-6, so it was quick too. They did sell a few here, mostly in the East. I've only seen maybe 2 of them for sale, it'd be a very cool and unusual car to have.

The Rover 3500 was good for trips because it had the Buick/Olds aluminum 215 V8, Rover bought the tooling from GM.  I had a '61 Buick Special with one, ran like a Swiss watch, but it was an expensive engine  to make, they had a block casting reject rate of over 20% I'm told, so was replaced by the iron V-6, cheap, durable, but vibrate-y. But otherwise Rover was a terrible car for reliaability - I remember when around '69-72 Rover was rated the worst car sold in the US by Consumer Reports, a friend with a 2000 TC struggled just to keep it running and on the road, nice to drive, but what a POS! Even new Land Rovers still suffer from that reputation nowadays... nice, but a constant stream of problems. Our XTerra is just as capable off road, but virtually trouble -free in comparison.

Always have loved Lancias, but they are super super rare in the US, '50/60s ones bring crazy money, and the late '70s/80s ones brought here rusted away in 5 minutes. Top Gear (UK's) Jeremy Clarkson did a hilarious show on them, pieces were literally falling off as they drove it and it finally caught on fire  LOL.

 I love Alfas too, we had a '66 Duetto boat-tail once, and still would love a pre-'73 2000GTV. I hope Chrylser/Fiat brings Alfa back, they already have really, the Dart is just a restyled Alfa, and a nice platform. Some of the Euro Alfas are some of the prettiest cars on the road IMO. And Fiat reliability is very good now I'm told.








firedome2013-11-02 11:23:12
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