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Author Topic: Maintaining car batteries  (Read 566 times)

Robert Rottman

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Maintaining car batteries
« on: November 22, 2011, 10:46:54 AM »

Ok...What do you guys do when storing your cars over the winter...Do you remove the battery and bring it indoors and just charge it for a few minutes a few times over the winter? (I use to do this before I owned 4 cars and 3 tractors...now it's too much work) 
 
2nd question: Do you use a manual type charger in which you must be very careful that you don't overcharge it and boil the acid out which will ruin the battery?
 
3rd question: Or...do you leave the battery in the car and put a battery maintainer on it of some sort. If so, What type do you use?
 
I see many types of trickle chargers, float mode monitoring, proceessor controlled multi-stage chargers out there...What is the best type of charger to use if you just want to leave the battery in the car, plug it in and forget about it?
 
Thanks, Bob
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Maintaining car batteries
« Reply #1 on: November 22, 2011, 11:33:41 AM »

As long as the batteries are brought in from the cold and under cover, they should hold their charge an easy three months or longer. I had nine deployments of 6 months to 12 months, had once I needed a jump by simply disconnecting the battery and leaving it in place, three were in Washington, the rest were in CA, so that may have a little bit to do with it, but the Washington cars did just fine outside in the weather.
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Steve

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Maintaining car batteries
« Reply #2 on: November 22, 2011, 12:04:57 PM »



I use the "Battery Tender" which is nothing more than a processor based float charger.  They will charge up to 2 amps.  Realistically, you should put a float charger on each one.  But I have had 3 batteries on a tender at once for months.  I only use a separate tender when the battery is in question.
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Maintaining car batteries
« Reply #3 on: November 22, 2011, 12:37:22 PM »

If that is the case, you need to have a couple light bulbs also on the battery tender so the batteries actually have a slight draw on them so it will actually charge, essentially forcing the plates to actually work a little bit, right?
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Steve

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Maintaining car batteries
« Reply #4 on: November 22, 2011, 12:51:03 PM »



I did allot of battery work when I was making decisions for the green project.  That and I have a history with UPS's from my work.
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Maintaining car batteries
« Reply #5 on: November 22, 2011, 12:57:23 PM »

Sounds good to me Steve.
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