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Author Topic: X pipe  (Read 2611 times)

Jason Goldsack

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X pipe
« Reply #15 on: December 30, 2010, 03:28:10 PM »

The the standpoint of cheap.. if that would help I will put one in...

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Jason

(Eileen)1965 Chrysler Windsor, 361/727/2.76 16.49 @ 86 mph

Steve

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« Reply #16 on: December 30, 2010, 04:12:53 PM »

Not done right, H pipes can unbalance the flow.  They also only balance.  They don't enhance the flow.  The X Pipe creates a double venturi which increases the flow.  That's partly why the heat is needed in the X design.
 
Either one is more benificial than just straight duals.
 
Look at a Y Pipe.  They don't jusy butt the odd bank into the pipe, they enter the main pipe on an angle.  This helps reduce the back pressure on the main side.
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Jason Goldsack

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X pipe
« Reply #17 on: December 31, 2010, 04:33:25 AM »

True... If you saw what is under the car at the front you would wonder how it runs as well as it does.. ( I didn't make it.. some exhaust shop hack made it)

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Jason

(Eileen)1965 Chrysler Windsor, 361/727/2.76 16.49 @ 86 mph

attkrlufy

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« Reply #18 on: January 13, 2011, 07:14:46 AM »


Quote from: POLARACO
Not done right, H pipes can unbalance the flow.
How do you unbalance exhaust flow by positioning an H-pipe "incorrectly?"  I thought that so long as you kept it somewhere upstream of the mufflers (closer to engine is better) it didn't really matter where it went.

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Steve

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« Reply #19 on: January 13, 2011, 10:09:25 AM »

Physics  Us old people need them often
 
There is more of a buffer before the muffler.  That's a guess
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Bill

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« Reply #20 on: January 14, 2011, 06:30:41 AM »

Even better than the H or X pipe the O pipe.  It's the answer to the H/X debate.
 
http://kalecoauto.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1&products_id=2
 
 
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attkrlufy

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« Reply #21 on: January 14, 2011, 08:08:19 AM »

Quote from: czervika
Even better than the H or X pipe the O pipe.  It's the answer to the H/X debate.
 


http://kalecoauto.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1&products_id=2


I must be slipping - took me about a min to realize what this was.  "The Onion" for parts catalogs.  Brilliant.

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1979 New Yorker - 360 4v, 2.71:1 rear, factory moonroof, factory road wheels


Steve

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« Reply #22 on: January 14, 2011, 12:21:05 PM »

What the?   Another gimmick????
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Jason Goldsack

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« Reply #23 on: February 22, 2011, 03:16:47 AM »

Curious here... I see Polaraco has the pipes crossing.. while the other one uses two bend cut in the middle and welded together.. does the exhaust cross sides, stay on the same side or splits with half going on each side...




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Jason

(Eileen)1965 Chrysler Windsor, 361/727/2.76 16.49 @ 86 mph

Bill

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« Reply #24 on: February 22, 2011, 08:44:09 AM »

it's just to equalize the pressure.  On my magnum the pipes run within a few inches of each other then they X but ts really more of just a bend and a welld where both pipes touch. 
 
Like this;
 

 
 
 
 
After seeing the new Mustang exhaust from magnaflow I'm back to questioning if it's really needed at all, they're omitting any x over.
 
 
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Steve

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« Reply #25 on: February 22, 2011, 11:13:29 AM »

yes, that's all it is.  It just equalizes the pressure so the engine will run more even.  That's the idea of single exhaust
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Bill

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« Reply #26 on: February 23, 2011, 03:05:14 AM »

Now now no need to get touchy... With all the different setups out there, it's hard to answer Winsors quetion as to weather the x pipe needs to be an actual X and let the exhaust flow from side to side or if it merely needs to blend.  czervika2011-02-23 08:06:07
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X pipe
« Reply #27 on: February 23, 2011, 06:29:21 AM »

X pipes work really good at the top end, the old H pipes work well at the bottom and all the way up to where the X pipes without any problem. The idea is that yes, the two sides are able to equalize the back pressure through the X and H pipes side to side. When an engine is balanced to within a couple grams from the factory, that imbalance of parts increases in weight exponentially. For example, 2 grams out of balance at 1000rpm is 4 grams, 2000rpm becomes 16 grams, 3000rpm becomes 32 grams and it continues. One way to help balance this is through the exhaust pulses to reduce the imbalance by causing the exhaust pulses to equalize pressure when the valves open, thus a different weights pulse opposite and counter each other. It isn't a perfect world, but it works better than having two two cylinder engines on each side of a V8 engine (look at the H pattern, dual plane intakes, it is 2 two cylinder engines split, which is why they work better at the bottom end). The more equal everything is pressure-wise on the back side, the better.  The one advantage of the X pipe over the H pipe is, as the rpm increases it helps pull the exhaust out the tailpipe because of the direction the main flow is, again, it helps balance the internals because it is trying to equally pull from the cycling pistons and valve opening vice pulse to push the exhaust pressure backwards or side to side, as with the H pipe. Which is better? Depends on how big your wallet is and whether your intention is to race from light to light, or have an overall balance over a greater driving style.
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Jason Goldsack

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« Reply #28 on: February 23, 2011, 03:29:57 PM »

If you saw the exhaust I got with the car you would say anything is an improvement..

The stock single exhaust is still on the passenger side and the Y was cut and another pipe run along the drivers side.. I think the pipes are too small but I'm not sure what the factory single size was..

If you saw it you would wonder how the heck with logs and this exhaust I actually went low 16's with 2.76 gears...


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Jason

(Eileen)1965 Chrysler Windsor, 361/727/2.76 16.49 @ 86 mph

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X pipe
« Reply #29 on: February 23, 2011, 03:50:46 PM »

Sounds like the standard way exhaust was split in the old days, saved a few bucks. Remember, also, that the smallest cross section  of the exhaust pipe, no matter where it is or how overall large it is, is your exhaust system size. There have been tons of documented exhaust pipes that are simply crimp bent and double walled pipe, where cutting them into pieces to improve the flow results in finding the inner pipe bent to the point that the smallest cross section on a 2.25inch stock exhaust is down to 1.70inch in a corner. You could have five inch exhaust throughout the whole system, but with a crimp like this, you have a 1.70 inch exhaust system, period.
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