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Author Topic: ok. probably a stupid question....  (Read 646 times)

Anthony Prescott

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ok. probably a stupid question....
« on: October 18, 2010, 09:47:59 AM »

i hear a lot of people say that an engine is made for acertain transmission  ex: ITS A 4 SPEED MOTOR.  what difference does it make? can you run an automatic behind a motor that came with a manual tranny? i dont see why not. info plase...
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Steve

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ok. probably a stupid question....
« Reply #1 on: October 18, 2010, 11:56:03 AM »

They are never stupid. 
 
Yep!  All it means is the crank is drilled out for a bronze pilot bearing.
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ok. probably a stupid question....
« Reply #2 on: October 18, 2010, 08:48:46 PM »

Also, depending on the year of the engine (carb'd or EFI computer controlled), there can be some differences, like the carb setup for squirters and needles, but most of all, mechanical advance (rarely vacuum advance) distributor. EFI will be mostly transmission controls, shift points, and advance curves.......and the bushing in the crank as noted.
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Snotty

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ok. probably a stupid question....
« Reply #3 on: October 19, 2010, 09:34:16 AM »

In early Mopar motors until somewhere around 1971, the cranks were drilled for pilot bushing or not.  After that, all were drilled.  AMC drilled all of their cranks so you could use them with either transmission, but would need to get a bushing if the motor was originally used with an automatic.  Can't speak about the other makes.
 
So, on these early Mopar Motors, you can use a "manual motor" with an automatic trans, but not vis-versa without drilling the crank.
 
Note that I am talking about early, carburated motors.  When dealing with motors made with EFI and the like, as is said above, there are many variables to consider. 
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Steve

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ok. probably a stupid question....
« Reply #4 on: October 19, 2010, 09:40:34 AM »

I have yet to see a motor not drilled from 60 up.  They used allot of the V8's in trucks.  The cranks were the same, but there were block diferences.  Big Blocks were used in the D series, so they were all pretty much drilled.  ABE's were all available in V8, sticks, so I guess the factory just went drilled as a standard.  Made sense.
 
Snotty, I think it was in the Mid 60's they started that. . But I could be wrong too.
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Anthony Prescott

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ok. probably a stupid question....
« Reply #5 on: October 19, 2010, 11:14:12 AM »

good stuff. here´s why i ask... for those of you that have been following my rants, this question pretains to my 413 industrial. it was originally pulled from a 72 dodge commander motor home. the block is stamped for the 71 year. Obviously, it came with an automatic, but, as stares for the 71 motors, its drilled for the pilot bearing. Its got the original holley carb on it. i believe it to be a 650. i could be wrong. Vacuum advanced dist. yada yada. I know i can put a 4 speed behind it, but what would i have to do to the engine other than install the pilot bearing???¿¿¿
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Steve

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ok. probably a stupid question....
« Reply #6 on: October 19, 2010, 12:04:31 PM »

Bolt the flywheel, clutch and trans on.  You're done.  Other than throttle and clutch linkage, there is nothing else.  I believe the timing settings are slightly different.
 
Follow Stans thread.  He's doing a conversion to a formal right now.
 
If it was a motor home, it is a very good bet it would be drilled.  That would be a truck version.  Trucks, well you know, are typically sticks.  MoHomes we designed for twits.  LOL  Sorry Pete
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glen cyr

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ok. probably a stupid question....
« Reply #7 on: October 19, 2010, 02:35:28 PM »

Make sure the bushing fits properly on the end of the trans shaft. I had to ream one a bit as it was too tight,and i had a heck of a time getting that shaft to go in. Those were the days when i could lay the tranny on my chest and muscle them in,....now i'd be in the trauma room!
 
Glen
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Steve

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ok. probably a stupid question....
« Reply #8 on: October 19, 2010, 04:06:48 PM »

Are the pilot bearings taperd inside like the Chebbies are?  I never had to replace one
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Snotty

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ok. probably a stupid question....
« Reply #9 on: October 20, 2010, 09:57:27 AM »

Quote from: POLARACO
I have yet to see a motor not drilled from 60 up. 
 
Friend of mine had a '68 383 HP from an auto car that the crank was not drilled.  I don't know if that was/is common by '68, but he had to put another crank in it.
 
As for the pilot bushing, I remember the one from my '70 Challenger have small roller bearings in it.  Either that, or I'm remembering somethng else entirely.  I know the one for the 401 is simply a large, brass, O ring.
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