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Author Topic: 62 New Yorker is Home aka plucked chicken  (Read 2614 times)

AJ

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62 New Yorker is Home aka plucked chicken
« Reply #30 on: September 11, 2010, 07:06:45 PM »



Whoa...this thing really is a plucked chicken.  HAH!
What a pitty...that's OK.  You'll make it right. :)
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1982 Jeep CJ7 :: AMC360 Edelbrock 4bbl :: TF999 Built :: Dana300 Twin Stick :: D30 \\ AMC20 :: 7" Lift :: 35" Xterrains on ARE 15x10s :: Plenty of Fab Work.  And stiil a DAMNED KID!

Steve

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62 New Yorker is Home aka plucked chicken
« Reply #31 on: September 28, 2010, 04:00:08 PM »

I dunno where to post this.  In the 65 thread, or here.  Well it's part of the 62 Project I guess.
 
Finally got my 2nd engine stand, I put the 65 413 0n it.  First order of business was to blast off the inch of caked mud off.  Cleaned up pretty fast as the mud and dirt soaked up most of the oil.  Next thing was to pop open the freeze plugs and start loosening the crap out.  Yeah right.  Had to chissel out the center of the rear one because the wather jacket sludge was pile over it and packed solid.  Took a bit to get the slug out.  Even paper thin.
 
The cylinders are in remarkable shape.  This motor may not have the thought 138,000 miles, looking at the wear, it may just be 38,000.  Going to leave the cylinders alone and freshen the bottom.  I may just leave the cam too.  Have to look at the lifters, but if they are in nice shapr, I'll just take them apart and clean them.
 
So it looks like it's a clean the crank, bearings, seals, timing chain and heads.  Might get away cheap on this after all
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Steve

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62 New Yorker is Home aka plucked chicken
« Reply #32 on: September 30, 2010, 04:18:01 PM »

I should have taked a picture of the block before I started, but Mark Moore can tell you.  The crud on this motor was over a 1/4" thick under the heads.  You couldn't even identify the oil pump except for the filter.
 
Thw water jackets have been blasted clean, the block is virtually spotless now, and it's time for work.
 

 

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Steve

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62 New Yorker is Home aka plucked chicken
« Reply #33 on: September 30, 2010, 08:41:02 PM »

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Steve

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62 New Yorker is Home aka plucked chicken
« Reply #34 on: January 22, 2011, 04:25:44 PM »

Quote from: POLARACO
I should have taked a picture of the block before I started, but Mark Moore can tell you.  The crud on this motor was over a 1/4" thick under the heads.  You couldn't even identify the oil pump except for the filter.
 
Thw water jackets have been blasted clean, the block is virtually spotless now, and it's time for work.
 

 



 
Here is what it looks like now.  The other head will be on tomorrow.  I have to lap all the valves yet.  Almost done.  Shove this in a corner, and prep the magnum for the 68.  Focus this year will be on the Fury and the 62.  The 300H will be in the tent by October.  The New Yorker will be running and driving by then.
 

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Steve

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62 New Yorker is Home aka plucked chicken
« Reply #35 on: January 23, 2011, 03:04:29 PM »





 
 

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62 New Yorker is Home aka plucked chicken
« Reply #36 on: January 23, 2011, 04:44:09 PM »

Quote from: POLARACO




 
 


THESE ARE MY FAVORITE HEADS WITHOUT A DOUBT.
 
Do the combustion chamber just like the LaRoy head and you will have it right. Take a flat edge and hold it against the face of he valves and you will see the lip that is in the way which messes up flow and needs to be removed completely. And if, from the looks of the picture the heads are already bolted on, oh, well, a loss is a loss, at least they are closed chamber heads.
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Steve

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62 New Yorker is Home aka plucked chicken
« Reply #37 on: January 23, 2011, 05:00:17 PM »

It doesn't matter on this engine.  This is for the 65 which will get flipped.  All these heads got was seals and a relap.  Sealed up the bottom end, paint and plop 
 
I'm working my up to the 700's I have for the 62 engine.  Those are the heads I will be putting time into. I'm taking the engine out of the 65, which is a fresh engine, and bolting on a ported set of heads.  I don't understand where you are talking about
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« Reply #38 on: January 23, 2011, 05:55:30 PM »

Look at the combustion chamber, top side is the spark plug, the lip is on the opposite side where the big quench area is. If you feel this edge you will see it is between .120-.150inch tall between the cast valve pocket and the machined surface of the quench area. This big lip is a ramp of the wrong type. Here is what is happening and what happens when it is removed. As the intake valve opens, air is sucked into the cylinder. As it comes out the valve opening it hits this lip and curls, which slows down what is being sucked into the cylinder, some reversion, or pressure builds up right there and it is all restriction that isn't needed. Remove the lip and the valve opens and as much as the cylinder can suck into the cylinder occurs at low and high lift. NOTE: if you look at flow numbers you will notice a jump in the increase as the lift increases. At some lift points there is a bigger than exponential increase where the valve opening is past this lip thus the big increase, and then at a higher lift there is a fall-off, where the lip builds pressure and reduces the flow which should not happen.  Same thing happens with the exhaust side of the equation, this lip, as the piston is coming up and squishing the exhaust out the valve pushes the exhaust gasses flat and against the valve itself instead of into the opening until, just like the intake, the valve is open at certain height. Remove the lip and the flow goes into the open exhaust valve because it is pushing into the combustion chamber pocket and then out more smoothly. Now, let's go to the burn side inside the combustion chamber and compare the stock stuff going on against the edged head with this lip removed. Piston comes up and the sparkplug sparks, flame starts travelling across the faces of the valves and when it gets to this lip, pictures show the gas burns and curls back into the previously burned area. Pictures have been taken of this flame front and that's what happens, then the piston drops, the compression drops and the excess fuel/air then burns colder because of less compression, coking and carbon looking junk is the result, the outside edge of the piston remains clean because the expansion of the burning gas sucks the cool fuel/air away from there and it remains cleaner (show me 100 crusty piston tops and I will tell you where the quench pads are every time). Now, with the lip/edge removed, as the sparkplug sparks at TDC and at the higher compression, the flame travels across the valve faces and continues as far across the piston and combustion chamber and acts as a wedge into the quench pad area and as the piston starts to drop the flame is still travelling outward (no curling until it hits the cylinder wall, and that's the end, full burn at higher compression, the goal from day one), and the last burns at a higher compression than the other head thus it is more efficient. Since it burns at a higher compression it is burning cleaner and hotter and faster, thus less pinging, less timing needed, cheaper fuels can be run at a higher compression ratio without a problem, and most of all, more power/torque is built than any other ported head on the planet. Additionally, this lip, since the fuel coming into the cylinder hits this sharp lip, sharp edges tend to remain hotter (look at where the most flames are on a burning 2X4 or split log, compare it to a round log), and this hotter edge is what causes pinging (hot sharp edge, fuel/air hitting it, instant spark right there). Remove the edge and the tendency to ping goes away.
 
This LaRoy guy has gotten the closest to what I do to a head to improve its efficiency and make the most power out there.  As the video says, there are three important things. Porting, porting and lastly, porting. Flow numbers are important, but if you have big flow numbers that are restricted getting into the combustion chamber itself, big numbers mean nothing.
 
Does this help?
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Steve

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62 New Yorker is Home aka plucked chicken
« Reply #39 on: January 23, 2011, 07:30:12 PM »

Does this help?
 
Nope! 
 
Are you talking about the bottom of the chamber around the valves?  Or are toy telling me I need to ramp the closed chamber part.
 
I remember what you had me do on the Magnum heads. 
 
BTW, I have to pull the heads on that motor to change the lifters.  I have damaged ones from the bent push rods
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62 New Yorker is Home aka plucked chicken
« Reply #40 on: January 23, 2011, 07:35:36 PM »

Since I got the digital camera and such, I will dig out my closed chamber heads to compare to yours, and I will do some drawings to illustrate what is going on, take pictures of them and post them, show you what is going on. I am sure we can get this both illustrated and figured out all at once. It is a lot to absorb all at once, gotta break it down a little better, pictures help me all the time.
 
What happened to the lifters? Bent pushrods should have been just that, bent pushrods, the lifters are difficult to damage without damaging other things, like the valves and the likes.
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Steve

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62 New Yorker is Home aka plucked chicken
« Reply #41 on: January 23, 2011, 07:47:01 PM »

I bent them turning the engine by hand.  Being partially blind, I misread the markings on the cam and screwed up.  The valves were fine.  I just bent all the exhaust push rods.  When you start it up, it makes a hello a racket. Takes a while to go away.  The lifters were new and never run when that happened
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62 New Yorker is Home aka plucked chicken
« Reply #42 on: January 23, 2011, 08:31:57 PM »

Bummer.
 
Steve. Send me a personal with an email address I can send you three pictures I have drawn. I remember my camera being a mega-pixel camera and I don't think I will be able to download them to this site, but you may be able to insert them after I send them to you. I had this problem in the past, I know it hasn't changed. I will get them to you around noon your time, have to deal with the building department in the morning, wish me luck.
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Steve

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62 New Yorker is Home aka plucked chicken
« Reply #43 on: January 24, 2011, 10:52:40 AM »

Seek and ye shall find.  I fixed them up for ya ed.
 

 

 

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Steve

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« Reply #44 on: January 24, 2011, 10:54:00 AM »

By the way, I think I am going to move all this to a new thread.  This is information worth having separated and we hijacked the wrong topic.  This goes with Jasons 361 thread, but I was avoiding Hijacking it.
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