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Author Topic: Getting the RB 383 back  (Read 4253 times)

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Getting the RB 383 back
« Reply #45 on: November 14, 2010, 05:44:12 PM »

There are two plugs back there, one for the oil pressure sending unit and another backup location where the bolt is showing in the picture, I believe they are 1/8th inch pipe plug threads. The next location is the valley pan, which needs to have a dab of goop at the corners where the heads meet the block, and then the bolts themselves that attach the little rail to  clamp the front and rear of the valley pan, the bolts on the intake manifold, and the valve covers. For the valley pan and intake manifold bolts, remember these bolts are open tapped threads into oil splashing around. The only way I have found to prevent them from leaking oil over time (took me a couple years to figure this out properly), is to take the bolt and wipe blue Permatex into the threads, but not all the threads. It should start about half an inch down from the bolt head and cover maybe three threads. Also, remember these are precision male and female threads joining together and all the amount of Permatex you need is to wipe it to fit in the grooves of the thread, any more just plugs up the oil pump screen over time if it breaks loose, so it doesn't take much. The valve cover leaking at the back can be the last place the oil can come from, if the valve covers are metal originals, chances are good the bolt holes have been crushed downward towards the head and the gasket can't seal any more. I like to actually dimple them to the head of the bolt side a little bit so when I tighten them down, being as the bolt holes are higher than the area around the lip, they tend to squeeze the gasket over a larger area than just the bolt hole location. If aluminum valve covers, quite often the casting marks will interfere with the gasket itself and a little aluminum alterning may be needed, a straight edge can find the high and low spots easily. There are several oil plugs and a cam freeze plug at the back of the block, but if they haven't been leaking before, they usually don't just start leaking.
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Ken

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Getting the RB 383 back
« Reply #46 on: November 14, 2010, 07:38:31 PM »

It could be leaking from the oil pressure sending unit, which has the arrow pointing to it in Stan's pic.  It is Bakelite and can allow leakage over time.

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Snotty

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Getting the RB 383 back
« Reply #47 on: November 15, 2010, 09:05:47 AM »

Could also be the rear main seal.
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Rob Molloy

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Getting the RB 383 back
« Reply #48 on: November 15, 2010, 10:18:43 AM »

I'm going to do some looking tonight, I think it may be coming from the valve cover. I dropped the starter off for a quote to get rebuilt. Waiting to hear back on that one. Man...this is going to be like a brand new running car by the time this is done LOL. Thanks for the help guys!
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Rob Molloy

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Getting the RB 383 back
« Reply #49 on: February 19, 2011, 08:37:35 AM »

Ok, so...I got the starter back a while ago, but the issue I've been dealing with the past month or so (still hasn't started for more than 3 seconds) is that the starter doesn't seem strong enough to crank the car. Brand new solenoid on the starter, the brushes and everything in the starter are new, I have a new starter relay, new battery cables...I know that there is power going through the starter, but it seems to be struggling. Any suggestions?
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Steve

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Getting the RB 383 back
« Reply #50 on: February 19, 2011, 10:12:19 AM »

That's a direct drive starter.  That's probably why you think that.  Or the engine is too tight.  Does it sound like it's struggling?  Or does it sound like the batterry is low? 
 
You can put a standard Chrysler starter with the reduction gear in if you want.  But use the High Torque.
 
What's the deal with this 3 seconds?
 
 
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Getting the RB 383 back
« Reply #51 on: February 19, 2011, 11:02:52 AM »

Yeah, what's up with that three seconds. It may be a condenser of all things. To verify it is not fuel, fill the fuel bowl and see if she runs for less than a minute but more than three seconds then stops, which could be fuel pump or fuel line/filter related.
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Rob Molloy

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« Reply #52 on: February 19, 2011, 06:19:25 PM »

I guess it's sounding like the starter struggling to turn the engine. It engages, and will crank (slowly) one or two times, then just stop. I try again, and it engages, but doesn't turn the engine. 

My concern right now is the starter. Even if the fuel pump and everything are working fine, won't do anything without a crank. Polarco, what kind of starter would you recommend getting? I picked one up before, but it didn't come anywhere near bolting up to the trans...
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Steve

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Getting the RB 383 back
« Reply #53 on: February 19, 2011, 07:17:56 PM »

Put an 1 1/4" socket on the front damper bolt and see if the engine turns free.  If it doesn't, shoot some oil into the cylinders and see if it turns easier.  You know where I'm going with this.  Could be the cylinders are too dry.  You could take the plugs all out and see what happens too.  Try to shoot the oil into the back of the cylinder.  This way the oil will flow all the way around the rings.  A flex neck oil can or a piece of hose on an oil can works best on a BB.
 
  Was the oil pump primed?
 
If the engine turns easily, you have a starter problem.  I would get a high torque reduction gear starter.   They run between $45 and $65.  I think you want like 1980.    They are all the same, big or small block.  
They spin faster and will start the car easier.  Also draw less from the battery. 
 

 
Put a piece of hose from the fuel pump to a gas can.  Sometimes they can be a old woman to get fuel up from the tank until you can run it longer. 
 
That's not a new pump?  Shame. . . LOL
 
We'll keep a light on for you
POLARACO2011-02-20 00:22:08
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Getting the RB 383 back
« Reply #54 on: February 19, 2011, 07:38:22 PM »

Looking back at the beginning of the post, which was quite some time ago, when you reassembled the engine, did you oil the wristpins on the pistons? From there, did you prime the oil pump with a drill and the hex rod, or an old distributor and the intermediate shaft with the cam gears ground down a whole lot so as not to damage the gear, and then ensure the fuel pump rod is in place to engage the fuel pump? The other thing, like I said before, is fill the carb itself with fuel, don't dump it down the throat, and limit your starter fluid, that stuff kills engines, especially fresh engines, too hot burning on a fresh engine. 
Now, if the wristpins weren't oiled, that't the fun one, they will seize and waste all eight pistons in about a minute. Very serious about this, had a friend do it to a BBC several years back, not a pretty site. Did you oil the cylinders when installing the pistons, along with the wristpins?
Speaking of starters, any starter, including the small high torque ones will work if not mistaken, small and big block are the same, the old big block high torque can be identified by an aluminum end piece where the two long 3/8X4inch bolts go in, regular ones have a stamped steel plate.
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Steve

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Getting the RB 383 back
« Reply #55 on: February 20, 2011, 07:32:58 AM »

Gee Ed. . . I don't remember.  Are the wrist pins pressure lubed?  I thought they were and that helped cools the piston

I guess my point is, he could run the pump and turn the motor over at the same time slowly to get oil up there.POLARACO2011-02-20 12:35:30
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Steve

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Getting the RB 383 back
« Reply #56 on: February 20, 2011, 07:44:33 AM »

Quote from: dana44
Looking back at the beginning of the post, which was quite some time ago, when you reassembled the engine, did you oil the wristpins on the pistons? From there, did you prime the oil pump with a drill and the hex rod, or an old distributor and the intermediate shaft with the cam gears ground down a whole lot so as not to damage the gear, and then ensure the fuel pump rod is in place to engage the fuel pump? The other thing, like I said before, is fill the carb itself with fuel, don't dump it down the throat, and limit your starter fluid, that stuff kills engines, especially fresh engines, too hot burning on a fresh engine. 
Now, if the wristpins weren't oiled, that't the fun one, they will seize and waste all eight pistons in about a minute. Very serious about this, had a friend do it to a BBC several years back, not a pretty site. Did you oil the cylinders when installing the pistons, along with the wristpins?


 
Now my 2 cents  LOL
 
I don't think that would cause the motor to drag like he's describing.  I just reminded myself a bit ago when working on that 413 for the 65.  after washing out the engine with solvents, I forgot to oil the cylinders and it wouldn't turn for crap.  But after flushing the sludge out of the galleries, priming was definitely in order.  By the way, for lazy asses like myself, PB Blaster is a very poor lube for that.  LOL  Motor oil.
 
But like I said before, if the motor is turning free, then just put a Mopar Screamer in there and get it over with.
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Rob Molloy

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Getting the RB 383 back
« Reply #57 on: February 20, 2011, 05:55:05 PM »

I will definately check the oil situation, and will get a new starter. It's gonna have to go on the back burner right now. My truck was broken into last night, so for right now money has to go into one of my other mopars. I will definately try and run some tests that don't cost anything though!
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Rob Molloy

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Getting the RB 383 back
« Reply #58 on: March 11, 2011, 06:43:17 AM »

Alright, back on track...kinda. new high torque starter and fuel pump will be in this afternoon. Don't know if I will put them on tonight, or wait until tomorrow morning...probably tonight because I want to get this thing started LOL!!! Wish me luck!
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Steve

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Getting the RB 383 back
« Reply #59 on: March 11, 2011, 12:09:14 PM »

I was just wondering about you yesterday
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