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Author Topic: Oil slinger  (Read 2743 times)

Stan Paralikis

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Oil slinger
« on: April 16, 2009, 04:10:37 AM »

When rebuilding the 440-WOB, I had a small problem installing the oil slinger.  Since the block I was rebuilding didn't originally have an oil slinger, I wasn't sure if I installed it correctly.     As it turns out, the oil slinger is noisy at high rpms.   At least I think it''s coming from the oil slinger (using my handy-dandy stethoscope that I "requisitioned" from when Pamela was in the hospital).

But back to the oil slinger:  Is it ALWAYS used?  I read that not having the oil slinger in there will result in premature front seal failure.

Robert Rottman

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Oil slinger
« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2009, 04:23:30 AM »


without oil slinger

with oil slinger
 
Obviously your 440 is much bigger than this lil' ol' 318...but is this basically the part you're talking about Stan? This little round sheet metal plate than sits on the crankshaft in front of the timing gear...behind the timing cover?? I looked at that thing when I pulled the cover and  immediately thought....What the heck is that thing? It fits so loose on the shaft...I thought immediately that it should rattle around in there...but I put mine back in the way I found it. Perhaps some one can shed some light on what it actually does??....Why would the front seal prematurely wear without this thin plate in back of it??
 
Bob
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Stan Paralikis

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Oil slinger
« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2009, 05:16:29 AM »



Yep. That lil piece of tin is the thingie I'm talking about.  And yes, it's rattling around like you thought.  I did something wrong I guess.




Quote from: Mopar Muscle
Before
installing the timing cover, the oil slinger needs to be installed.
There has always been controversy as to the benefit of this part, but
we like to install it as we feel it better oils the timing chain and
gears and helps prevent leaks at the front main seal

Commando12009-04-16 10:27:07

Stan Paralikis

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Oil slinger
« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2009, 05:28:33 AM »

I just dread the thought of having to yank the front end off to pull that thing off. 

Robert Rottman

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Oil slinger
« Reply #4 on: April 16, 2009, 05:33:25 AM »

Stan, Like I said...when I saw how loose it fits on the crankshaft...(in it's own groove approx. 1/4" wide-"sloppy"), plus it's sloppy on the woodruff key too...I thought the same thing as you're hearing...man this must make a racket in there....but then I thought well... maybe the oil bath keeps it from rattling around... and then I put it on the other way (bend inward towards chain) and it clearly was rubbing up against the chain...and I said to myself..."well...whoever put it in there last must have had it the right way"...You see....the little bend at the top looks like it should go out wards..(towards the front) or else it clearly rubs the chain. I would think that would wear itself/chain down quickly that way...You didn't have the the little bend on it go inward toward the chain did you? Perhaps thats the right way I don't know...couldn't find any pictures of it in my Chiltons...I certainly have been wrong many times before...perhaps I should have brought this up before I put my timing cover on...
 
Bob
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Robert Rottman

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Oil slinger
« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2009, 05:41:14 AM »

Quote from: Commando1
I just dread the thought of having to yank the front end off to pull that thing off. 
 
furyfever2009-04-16 13:37:48
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Stan Paralikis

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Oil slinger
« Reply #6 on: April 16, 2009, 05:48:48 AM »


I'll bet a million dollars I put it on backwards...



Commando12009-04-16 10:53:53

Butch Houghton

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Oil slinger
« Reply #7 on: April 16, 2009, 07:42:23 AM »


If that's your picture then it looks right,  lip facing out.

Another thought,  the damper should be snug up against it.    Maybe you're just a bit short of being completely tightened down on the damper?   Wouldn't take much,  a few thou out & it would rattle.  Try tightening it a bit more first just to see.

Butch

HemiFury2009-04-16 12:42:56
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Stan Paralikis

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Oil slinger
« Reply #8 on: April 16, 2009, 08:43:46 AM »

That isn't my picture.  That's a pic I got online showing the correct way.

Crank up some more on the damper.  Hmmmmmmmmmm....


Robert Rottman

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Oil slinger
« Reply #9 on: April 16, 2009, 08:44:49 AM »

[/QUOTE]
 
Thanks Butch...You just educated me...A properly tightened damper (harmonic balancer) is what sets the oil slinger in it's rightful place then huh? I searched for a torque spec on the damper...couldn't find one...Is there a torque spec on it? Stan maybe Butch is on to something here for you...See if your damper is tightened properly...maybe you have torque spec to help me out too? I just tightened mine until the motor turned (heads on)
 
furyfever2009-04-16 13:56:40
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Herman

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Oil slinger
« Reply #10 on: April 16, 2009, 11:49:37 AM »

That's not enough, the crankbolt will come loose.
You should keep the engine from rotating and torque the bolt to (going from memory) 135 ft/lbs.



Butch Houghton

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Oil slinger
« Reply #11 on: April 17, 2009, 06:17:43 AM »

Yeah,   125-135 Lb-Ft sounds right to me.  I'd have to look it up to be sure.

I'm lazy now,  just use the Impact for them.  But then usually check it after that.   

The trick is blocking the engine from turning.   If you just run it down until the engine turns  & say have no plugs in then in reality you only have about 50 LB's torque on it at most.

Safest way to block in the car would be to pull the trans inspection cover & use a Prybar or Crowbar slipped in between the flexplate & block that can swing up & catch either a pipe or the framerail.   Then you can tighten it properly. 

On a stand it's easy, same thing... a bar with just the crank bolts in & wedged against the engine stand.

Keep in mind the Damper has about an .001 interference fit so you're working against that too.

Butch


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Stan Paralikis

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Oil slinger
« Reply #12 on: April 17, 2009, 06:44:50 AM »

Or....................
I could turn up the radio.


Herman

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Oil slinger
« Reply #13 on: April 17, 2009, 02:21:56 PM »

Don't tell anyone, but I always put a little locktite on the crank bolt and tighten it with an impact wrench aswell.


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