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Author Topic: Our old cars and alky gas  (Read 646 times)

firedome

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Our old cars and alky gas
« on: November 08, 2008, 03:05:17 PM »

Seems like we have no choice nowadays but to put alky gas in our cars,
at least here in NY.... what should we be doing to prevent problems in
the fuel system etc??

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Stan Paralikis

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« Reply #1 on: November 08, 2008, 03:30:33 PM »

I haven't noticed any difference but it has played havoc with the computer in my wifes Mazda.  So, evey tankfull, I have to supplement it with an additive. 

firedome

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« Reply #2 on: November 09, 2008, 03:24:54 AM »

I've heard it can affect hoses, seals, etc? Anyone? 

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Mike

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« Reply #3 on: November 09, 2008, 09:48:09 AM »

The only difference I've noticed Roger is that my milage has went down
and I always put 93 in my car! I should prob get some octane boster or
some other kind of additive as well.

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Matt Aker

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« Reply #4 on: November 09, 2008, 12:09:25 PM »

I've heard of issues with fuel injector o-rings drying out and leaking under pressure.  I wonder what long-term exposure to the new gasoline would do to an accelerator pump diaphram, especially the original leather ones...
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Our old cars and alky gas
« Reply #5 on: November 09, 2008, 04:37:47 PM »

The old cars will do fine.  But if you are planning on a daily driver, I would strongly suggest hardened seats.
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firedome

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« Reply #6 on: November 10, 2008, 04:07:44 AM »

Steve - wouldn't pretty much any car in the catalytic converter era -
ie after '75 or so - have hardened seats so they could run on unleaded
gas? But pre lead cars wouldn't?

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firedome

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« Reply #7 on: November 10, 2008, 04:08:19 AM »

I meant pre-Unleaded...

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Snotty

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« Reply #8 on: November 10, 2008, 10:17:41 AM »

Yes, all cars built after '74 have hardenend seats.  I've also read that most cars built by '71 had them as well, as the industry knew the Unleaded rule was coming.  Many stations were already selling "Low-Lead" gas by 1970.
 


I have a question as to the main reason for this post - can you not buy regular gas (unleaded) back east anymore?  Here in California one would be hard-pressed to find an existing E-85 station.  What's up?
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Steve

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« Reply #9 on: November 10, 2008, 11:04:41 AM »

Quote from: firedome
Steve - wouldn't pretty much any car in the catalytic converter era - ie after '75 or so - have hardened seats so they could run on unleaded gas? But pre lead cars wouldn't?
 
Anything with a Cat will have hardened seats
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Rich

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« Reply #10 on: November 11, 2008, 07:28:06 AM »

Any of the Big Block heads from 71 and up (the 346's and 452's) have induction hardened seats that should be fine as long as the seats haven't been reground too many times. Use stainless steel valves and they will last a loooong time.
 
The alky fuel will dry out and crack the rubber in your old fuel lines and carb bits--but any new rebuild kit will have parts that are compatible with the crappy gas. I replaced the little bits of hose in my fuel line from the tank all the way to the carb, and put in a fresh carb kit.
 
The biggest difference you will notice is that your fuel milage will decrease about 25%, and you be be down on power--you'll think your driving your grandpa's Buick!
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Alan

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« Reply #11 on: November 29, 2008, 01:14:16 PM »

Heres my two cents on the subject.
 
Most gas (at least in the east) now has 10% ethanol in it. I work in a parts store and have heard many complaints about it making water in the fuel. Some cars must use dry gas all the time or their cars run like cr-p. It also reduces your gas mileage and increases the cost of the gas. Don't you just love government mandates? 
 
Here a couple of quotes about ethanol...
 
Oh, yes. Ethanol can't travel in pipelines along with gasoline, because it picks up excess water and impurities. As a result, ethanol needs to be transported by trucks, trains, or barges, which is more expensive and complicated than sending it down a pipeline. As refiners switched to ethanol this spring, the change in transport needs has likely contributed to the rise in gas prices. Some experts argue that the U. S. doesn't have adequate infrastructure for wide ethanol use."[/color]
 
and
 
Surprise, surprise, it isn't. The move this spring by more regions to use ethanol means that demand has spiked, driving up prices. On Monday, the New York harbor price was around $3 per gallon compared with about $2.28 for gasoline (before being mixed with ethanol). In other words, for now ethanol is helping to increase prices at the pump, not to push them down."[/color]
 
one more...
 
Yes. Some ethanol skeptics have even argued that the process involved in growing grain and then transforming it into ethanol requires more energy from fossil fuels than ethanol generates. In other words, they say the whole movement is a farce".[/color]
 
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firedome

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« Reply #12 on: December 01, 2008, 03:53:29 AM »

To answer Snotty - yes, here in the East in many places all gas of all
grades is 10% ethanol, I think it has to do with replacing MTBE for
winter gas, but it may be year round now, I'm not positive... I do know
that in recent years the winter formulation was different in attempt to
reduce pollution during cold weather.

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Snotty

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« Reply #13 on: December 01, 2008, 12:24:48 PM »

OK, thanks.  I don't think that;s the case here in the west, but I am uncertain.  As far as I know, we can't even get E-85 yet.
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firedome

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« Reply #14 on: December 01, 2008, 03:41:41 PM »

I've never seen E-85 here either...  apparently in Brazil they run
on straight ethanol, and have for years... lots of sugar cane or
something that is fermentable there.

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