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Author Topic: Cleaning and removing intake  (Read 638 times)

attkrlufy

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Cleaning and removing intake
« on: October 16, 2008, 11:17:06 AM »

I'm prepping for some fairly major surgery to Wanda in about 3 weeks and thought this would be a good time to get some info about how to clean the intake.  I'm also cleaning the valve covers, too, as they're a mess.

Any tips/tricks for taking off the intake and cleaning it?  Any cleaning products to recommend?  Anything to avoid doing while the intake is off?  I know to pull the electric choke heater assy. off before cleaning it....anything else?  Can I leave the other 8 million sensors in the intake assy. alone or do they come off, too?

I think this is a good time to get into the intake for two reasons:

1) The outside is FILTHY.  It's worse than my bedroom closet when I was in college.  There's oil and gas and crud and somethings that look like pudding(???!!) everywhere.  I've got a new Thermoquad going on top of it and I think this will be a good opportunity to clean all the muck off.

2) It's FILTHY on the inside, too (probably)!  The valve cover gaskets are shot meaning oil is everywhere over the top of the engine (the Oil breather and PCV no longer working isn't helping, either).  I wouldn't be surprised if that heater/crossover thinggy (I forget it's name) is also mucked up and I doubt the EGR works anymore, what with all the carbon and oil swirling around/in the intake.

I'm looking for comments and suggestions.  I don't think this will be easy - but I'm not expecting too many problems.


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Steve

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Cleaning and removing intake
« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2008, 02:33:05 PM »

Might I suggest you strip the intake when you get it off and take it to an engine rebuilding shop and let him boil it.  You can't do as good a job on it unless you stuff it in the dishwasher 200 times.  (Imagine the spots on the glasses! )
 
They submerge it  in a caustic which rips the grease right off.  The benefit of that is getting the exhaust cross over cleaned out too.  318s were nutorious for clogging the exhaust cross overs.  If you had an electric choke, that wouldn't usually matter that much, but for MPG and future re-carboning, it does.
 
Take the valve covers to them too.  you'll get them back squeeky clean, maybe some paint left, which you can sand off and ready for prime an paint.
 
It may cost you 40 or 50 bucks. . .but in the long run?  Worth every dime.
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Stan Paralikis

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Cleaning and removing intake
« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2008, 03:08:27 PM »

I use a method that works as well as Steve's suggestion.  The preferable way is to bring it to someone but sometimes I like tap dancing on the mine field:

I have a 10 gallon galvonized oval tub that I fill with water and lye (Drano) or suphuric acid (also found in the drain cleaner section).  Yah, it's dangerous, but, that's the way I live. Commando12008-10-16 20:10:44

Robert Rottman

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Cleaning and removing intake
« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2008, 03:16:32 PM »

Just finished doing this to my 70 Fury 318. Not too much to take off mine but the carb, plug wires....upper rad hose...thermostat...It's a time consuming job...I did mine because the choke would never open up fully. Sure enough when I got in there the crossover was jam packed with carbon and the inlets on the motor side jam packed to for ~2" in. I slowly picked away at it all had the shop vac going at the same time and tried not to lose any. When I got the opening cleaned real well I used the shop vac right on over the passageways to  suck any debris up that may have fallen down in. I had finished cleaning the intake itself when I typed up a post about it and CBarge and Polaraco said the same thing "get it boiled" I already put a lot of time into mine so I didn't do this...I rammed a coat hanger through mine picking and picking away. After doing this, I agree with them..It would be much easier on you. I also used degreaser, gumout to clean the exterior up...power washed it too...Make sure you clean all the gasketed surfaces real well of all the old gasket debris and lay a towel down in your engine to catch any debris that falls down in. I was real careful about this. I didn't want any junk to get down into the lifter/cam area. Got a new intake gasket set...I used a spray type silicone sealer on the gaskets before I installed them and plopped the intake back down. I'm not sure what everybody else uses...I also did not use the cork front/rear seals used high temp RTV...I guess the cork gets brittle and also tends to be too thick? That's what I've heard anyways...have done it this way on both my 318's now...without any issues...Changed oil/filter when I finished too...My 318 is running great now...starts up nicely..lots o power...I'm happy with it...I hope you have a good healthy back. I don't...(have 2 herniated discs) and it made the job harder....Best wishes to you.... furyfever2008-10-16 20:21:38
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Steve

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Cleaning and removing intake
« Reply #4 on: October 16, 2008, 03:16:33 PM »

yer too old for Danger. . .I saw you drive. . .
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Stitcherbob

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Cleaning and removing intake
« Reply #5 on: October 16, 2008, 04:29:20 PM »


I use a method that works as well as Steve's suggestion.  The preferable way is to bring it to someone but sometimes I like tap dancing on the mine field:

I have a 10 gallon galvonized oval tub that I fill with water and lye (Drano) or suphuric acid (also found in the drain cleaner section).  Yah, it's dangerous, but, that's the way I live. [/QUOTE]

I did a Studey motor in a 55 gallon barrel with 16 cans of Drano and a salamander kerosene heater blasting on it.....don't know where that concoction went when I was finished...

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Stitcherbob

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Cleaning and removing intake
« Reply #6 on: October 16, 2008, 04:31:10 PM »


Quote from: POLARACO
Might I suggest you strip the intake when you get it off and take it to an engine rebuilding shop and let him boil it.  You can't do as good a job on it unless you stuff it in the dishwasher 200 times.  (Imagine the spots on the glasses! )

Remind me about this next time you offer me a glass of water over at the "Casa de Steve"


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Stan Paralikis

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Cleaning and removing intake
« Reply #7 on: October 17, 2008, 03:50:21 AM »

[/QUOTE]
 
Not to worry.  Lye is derived from hardwood.  Plus, lye is used in making soap.
 
It's all natural...

Stitcherbob

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Cleaning and removing intake
« Reply #8 on: October 17, 2008, 03:54:32 AM »

Tell that to the guys who drove their new 4X4's through that mysterious puddle in the road!

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attkrlufy

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Cleaning and removing intake
« Reply #9 on: October 17, 2008, 04:18:01 AM »



Quote from: POLARACO
Might I suggest you strip the intake when you get it off and take it to an engine rebuilding shop and let him boil it.  You can't do as good a job on it unless you stuff it in the dishwasher 200 times.  (Imagine the spots on the glasses! )
That's cool.  I'm renting a place right now so it wouldn't be my dishwasher, anyway.
 
Quote from: POLARACO
Take the valve covers to them too.  you'll get them back squeeky clean, maybe some paint left, which you can sand off and ready for prime an paint.
I imagine the intake would also come back paintless, as well?  You know, it's funny, I replaced the PCV and oil breather yesterday and had to wipe around the grommits where they sit.....I forgot the covers and intake are supposed to be BLUE - that's how dirty this engine is.

 
Quote from: POLARACO
It may cost you 40 or 50 bucks. . .but in the long run?  Worth every dime.
I think you're right.  After reading what FuryFever went through....I think I'll pay $50 NOT to have to go through that.
attkrlufy2008-10-17 11:01:44
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attkrlufy

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Cleaning and removing intake
« Reply #10 on: October 17, 2008, 04:23:34 AM »


Quote from: Commando1
Not to worry.  Lye is derived from hardwood.  Plus, lye is used in making soap.

It's all natural...
That reminds me of a George Carlin bit:

"'All natural' - what does that mean?  It means it comes from nature.  Well....EVERYTHING comes from nature.  Dog sh*t is technically 'all natural', but it sure makes a lousy dinner."

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AJ

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Cleaning and removing intake
« Reply #11 on: October 27, 2008, 11:53:37 AM »

Quote from: attkrlufy
Quote from: Commando1
Not to worry.  Lye is derived from hardwood.  Plus, lye is used in making soap.
 
Oh, George, he is missed.
 
In the process of doing the same here - Intake\\Carb - take the intake to a shop and have it boiled - i def agree with that.  Might as well have the blast the covers too - make it look purdy.
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