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Author Topic: Keeping a car original  (Read 1220 times)

Tom Atkinson

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Keeping a car original
« on: May 27, 2008, 06:01:27 AM »

As may of you know the brakes on my car are a mess.  Many here have suggested going to a double  master rather than the single it has now.   After reading here and a few mags I'm also thinking of having it converted to disc brake.   My question is what will this do to it's value as a collectors car?  Safety is the foremost issue but I'd hate to do this and find out I runined the car.    I'm going to have a shop do the work to repair them.
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R. Dave Carr

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« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2008, 07:10:00 AM »

My take has always been if you are going to drive the car much beyond car shows and parades, improved safety trumps collectability concerns.  I'm not saying install roll cages and SRS systems, but safer brakes certainly are worth the trade off.
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Jimmy

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« Reply #2 on: May 27, 2008, 09:39:05 AM »

    I just jammed a 67' dual master to a new replacement 66' booster on my 300 and kept the drum front setup, stops just fine.  
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Bill Mounteer

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Keeping a car original
« Reply #3 on: May 27, 2008, 10:14:15 AM »

Probably wouldn't reduce it's value particularly if you use stock disc brake components. Even the Concour guys don't lose many if any points for safety upgrades like brakes and seat belts. You can always keep all the old parts if a future buyer wants to revert to pure stock.

If it's a trailer queen, whats the point. However if you plan to drive it, the value will take a bigger hit by a fender bender caused by crappy brakes than upgrading to disc.


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Snotty

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Keeping a car original
« Reply #4 on: May 27, 2008, 10:14:51 AM »

I'm with Carman.  If you want to enter your car in "Judged" shows, non-factory applications will hurt you.  But if you want ths to be a driver, go with what's safer and better.
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Steve

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Keeping a car original
« Reply #5 on: May 27, 2008, 11:19:09 AM »

Quote from: Snotty
I'm with Carman.  If you want to enter your car in "Judged" shows, non-factory applications will hurt you.  But if you want ths to be a driver, go with what's safer and better.
 
Same here
 
Unfortunately, most judges don't know Mopar like we do.  It also depends on the class you go for.
 
To embelish on what Carman and the Snotster said, take it a step further and convert it to front discs.  There are kits or you can gat a set of 73 spindles
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Bill Mounteer

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Keeping a car original
« Reply #6 on: May 27, 2008, 03:05:09 PM »

I'm also with Carman, Snotty and Steve, I just didn't explain it properly. In '70 disc brakes were a factory option, so when I said stock parts, I really was saying use exactly what the factory would have installed in '70.  Any judge picking up the alteration would have to be very familiar with C-Bodies and enough about fender tags to notice a missing B41 code.  Even then they might not notice because in Plymouth, all 440 cars seemed to automatically get disc brakes. Don't know about Chrysler since I've seen lots with 440 and drum brakes.

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Leaburn Patey

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Keeping a car original
« Reply #7 on: May 27, 2008, 03:28:03 PM »

Yep...440 and drum brakes here.Yet they were the largest in the industry at the time. 255.4 square inches of effected bonding material in 11X3 drums on all four corners.
If I had the coin,I would convert to disc just to reduce the maitenance---and stopping distances!!
Build the car the way YOU want.
I agree with everyone else here.Show poodle/trailer queen keep it stock.
Nice driver that shows very well go with the conversion.
I never liked the single pot master anyways..Like a cheap set of Christmas lights,one line or wheel cylinder  pops all brakes go  out!
 Having good brakes is always important no matter what you drive.
CBarge2008-05-27 20:34:50
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Arlen Vander Hoff

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Keeping a car original
« Reply #8 on: May 27, 2008, 04:51:18 PM »

Like our fearless leader always says....(suprised he didn't say it) Just don't do anything you can't put back. If you go with a kit or a '73 factory set up just keep all the drum stuff so you or someone else can put it back if they or you want.
 
 
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firedome

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« Reply #9 on: May 28, 2008, 04:14:50 AM »

I remember a debate in one of the car magazines at the time, might have
been C & D, or Hot Rod, but the upshot was that when properly set
up and in certain (dry) conditions drums can function every bit as well
as discs, with the the caveat being they don't cool as quickly in many
repeated hard stops or on long downhill mountain runs - so if you are
only driving moderately and to car shows and such, drums might be quite
fine. If you are driving aggressively or in hilly terrain, discs would
be a good thing.  In either event, a single to dual MC conversion
is a smart thing to do.

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Tom Atkinson

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Keeping a car original
« Reply #10 on: May 28, 2008, 05:05:52 AM »

Ya'll have convinced me at the least I'm going to a dual master. 
 
I'm in Florida so as for hills, what's a hill?  I'll mostly be driving for pleasure a few miles, try to show it off here and thee.  No real hard fast driving either.   Because of this I think I'll just stick with the drums.   This time I'll maintain them better and can always come here for help with keeping them in shape too.
 
You would think if it were a safety upgrade shows would not hold it against you.  The other side of the coin with the shape my car's in right now I don't think she'd win anything.  Split seats, mucked up engine compartment.
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Stan Paralikis

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Keeping a car original
« Reply #11 on: May 28, 2008, 09:34:04 AM »

Quote from: Chrysler300
I'm in Florida so as for hills, what's a hill? 

Dual master cylinder and totally rebuilt drum brakes are perfectly fine.
Now.  About those 22" rims...
 

Steve

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Keeping a car original
« Reply #12 on: May 28, 2008, 09:44:19 AM »

Quote from: firedome
I remember a debate in one of the car magazines at the time, might have been C & D, or Hot Rod, but the upshot was that when properly set up and in certain (dry) conditions drums can function every bit as well as discs, with the the caveat being they don't cool as quickly in many repeated hard stops or on long downhill mountain runs - so if you are only driving moderately and to car shows and such, drums might be quite fine. If you are driving aggressively or in hilly terrain, discs would be a good thing.  In either event, a single to dual MC conversion is a smart thing to do.
 
I agree with that. 
 
GM used a finned drum while Dorf and Mopar did not.  Their Kelsey Hayes systems were better in the cooling aspect and the drums didn't warp as fast.
 
Much is going to depend on what is found when he pulls the drums off.  I'm not too sure you can still get the drums.
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Snotty

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Keeping a car original
« Reply #13 on: May 28, 2008, 10:39:41 AM »

Let's not fool ourselves, even disks will cook on a long down hill if the driver keeps hitting the pedal.  That's why the best thing to do on a hill is gear down and let the engine braking hold the car.  Hit the brakes periodically in this fashion and all will be well, even drums. 
 
Just the same, I prefer disks.
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R. Dave Carr

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« Reply #14 on: May 28, 2008, 10:44:58 AM »

Maybe not driving like a bat out of hell on the down hills will help also......
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