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Author Topic: Keeping a car original  (Read 1080 times)

Steve

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Keeping a car original
« Reply #15 on: May 28, 2008, 11:01:42 AM »

Snotty is a Steering wheel monitor. 
 
But engine braking is good as long as you keep the engine revs in check.  My wife tried to do that once in my old 68 Satilite.   It took a week to find all the engine parts at the side of the road.
 
Dave has a point.  Florida doesn't have that problem.  Biggest hill you guys have is dog poop.  For what you are doing, the drums will be fine.  But as previously advised, change all the rubber hoses and inspect every inch of the steel brake lines.
 
Speaking of, but related. . .SNOTTY WAKE UP!  Pay Attention!!!
 
My buddy Tom, Parts Natzi at the dealership, had a brake hose blow on him in his 2002 Stratus last night.  Ran under a pickup and totled the car.  He is currently driving my Moms Stratus as a loaner for a few days.  His 02 is totled.
 
So much for dual masters.
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R. Dave Carr

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Keeping a car original
« Reply #16 on: May 28, 2008, 11:09:28 AM »

Every way out of the valley I live in features a 6 percent down grade.  Mounting driving is what I grew up on.  That being said, I have NEVER smoked brakes in ANYTHING I have driven sanely.  That being said, I did brake fade the front discs on a '73 Datsun 510 I set up for canyon carving whilst driving "spritidly"......  They didn't fail, but they sure did fade!  I backed out of it after that.
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1968 Newport Convertible

Matt Aker

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Keeping a car original
« Reply #17 on: May 28, 2008, 04:44:02 PM »

I remember the time the single pot master cylinder gave-out on my '66 NYer.  I was waiting at the drive-thru at Wendy's...  right to the floor the pedal went!  THAT could have been bad in other circumstances.  I nursed the car home and got a new master the next day.
 
With a dual reservoir master you will at least have partial braking, barring a total blowout.  I am a purist and had NO issues with four-wheel drums, but the master cylinder upgrade would be adviseable.  My NYer had 11x3"s on all corners and never gave me any trouble in the 60k-plus miles I drove it.  What Jimmy did with his 300 is the way to go for safety without compromising originality.
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Bill Mounteer

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Keeping a car original
« Reply #18 on: May 28, 2008, 05:55:00 PM »

Truth be known, the biggest reason why all my cars and trucks have disc brakes is that I hate working on drum brakes. There is a lot to be said for the ease at which disc pads can be changed vs the work required to change drum brake shoes and get the darn things adjusted properly. That being said, properly setup drum brakes are more than adequate for all normal driving.


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Leaburn Patey

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Keeping a car original
« Reply #19 on: May 28, 2008, 06:43:15 PM »

Bill,you will see how a set of well tuned 11X3's  whoa! down the New Yorker!!
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1973 Satelitte wagon
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Snotty

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Keeping a car original
« Reply #20 on: May 28, 2008, 10:06:29 PM »

Quote from: Fury440
Truth be known, the biggest reason why all my cars and trucks have disc brakes is that I hate working on drum brakes. There is a lot to be said for the ease at which disc pads can be changed vs the work required to change drum brake shoes and get the darn things adjusted properly.
 


Amen Brother!
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Tom Atkinson

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« Reply #21 on: May 29, 2008, 05:04:35 AM »

Living in Florida anchors are easy to find.  I'm toying the idea of a good strong rope tied to the rear axle.
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Stan Paralikis

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Keeping a car original
« Reply #22 on: May 29, 2008, 05:08:38 AM »


Tom Atkinson

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« Reply #23 on: May 29, 2008, 06:07:20 AM »

That was tied to a light pole.  No give.  The anchor will drag a bit before really biting in.  Much slower and gentle stop.
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firedome

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Keeping a car original
« Reply #24 on: June 01, 2008, 06:25:07 AM »

Steve mentioned the GM finned drums... I think Buick was first to get
them around '57/58 when US cars were being roundly criticized for their
lousy brakes by Uncle Tom McCahill (now there was a great auto writer,
ya gotta love his way with a metaphor) and the like. The finned drums
were a huge improvement for cooling and were later adapted by the other
divisions. 

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Leaburn Patey

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Keeping a car original
« Reply #25 on: June 01, 2008, 06:48:40 AM »

Quote from: firedome
Steve mentioned the GM finned drums... I think Buick was first to get them around '57/58 when US cars were being roundly criticized for their lousy brakes by Uncle Tom McCahill (now there was a great auto writer, ya gotta love his way with a metaphor) and the like. The finned drums were a huge improvement for cooling and were later adapted by the other divisions. 
The finned drums were also popular with the hot rod/rat rod scene as well.
 
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1968 Newport Custom project BOAB
1973 Satelitte wagon
1983 Dodge 400
2006 300C HEMI!!

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